WEBINAR: Reinvigorating Multilateralism Amidst and Post the Covid-19 Pandemic, 18 August 2020, 14:00

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn), Department of Political Sciences University of Pretoria

In conjunction with the Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Pretoria

invite you to a Webinar on:

Reinvigorating Multilateralism Amidst and Post the Covid-19 Pandemic

The Covid-19 pandemic came as a wake-up call to multilateralism. In concerted efforts to control spread and cope with the immediate effects of the coronavirus disease, countries imposed unprecedented and strict measures such as border closures. But infectious diseases like the coronavirus disease know no borders, paradoxically drawing attention to the need for a global governance system that is grounded in international agreement and collaboration. However, multilateralism was itself apparently under threat just prior to the Covid-19 outbreak. This was because of a backlash on globalisation and the rise in populist regimes in developed countries. As countries reopen and ease down restrictions imposed earlier in response to the Covid-19 outbreak, there is talk of a ‘new normal’. That makes it necessary to look afresh at multilateralism, what it is, why it is important, where it ‘is’ at present and what seems to be its future trends. Also, given international events that occurred between March and June 2020, it is necessary to consider multilateralism and Covid-19 as well as multilateralism and (the fight against) racism. And what can be said about multilateralism and unilateralism and South Africa–Iran cooperation in multilateral organizations?

 

Date:                                        18 August 2020
Time:                                       14:00 – 16:00
RSVP:                                      Click here.

Queries:                                   kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

 

Mohammad Marandi is a Professor of American studies, American history and literature, Colonial and postcolonial studies in the faculty of world studies, University of Tehran. He is one of the most invited university professor of Iran to international Seminars in Political issues. Marandi also has appeared as an eminent political and social commentator on international news networks such as PBS, RT, ABC, CGTN, CNN, BBC, Al Jazeera, and Press TV.

 

 

 

Hamed Mousavi is an assistant professor at the Faculty of Law and Political Science, University of Tehran. His research interests include Israeli foreign policy, US foreign policy, and Middle East politics. He is currently writing a book on the role of ideology in Israeli foreign policy. Dr. Mousavi regularly appears as a political analyst on various news channels including, PressTV, IRIB, CNN, BBC, Aljazeera and RT.

 

Amir Saed Vakil is an assistant professor at the Faculty of Law and Political Science, University of Tehran. He is in close relationship with UN offices in Tehran. His research interests include human rights, dispute resolution, responsibility, and acts of states. Vakil has appeared as an International law commentator on international news networks such as Press TV, IRIB.

 

Yolanda Kemp Spies was trained as a diplomat at the South African Foreign Ministry and at Oxford University, UK. She practiced diplomacy for 19 years, and lived and worked on four continents before she joined academia. She completed her doctorate in International Relations in 2005, after which she designed a Master of Diplomatic Studies program for the University of Pretoria. She directed the programme until 2016. From 2016 to 2019 she lectured in Masters programmes at (the American) Webster University’s Ghana campus. Her academic specialization and publications include Diplomacy, Foreign Policy Analysis, International Organizations, International Law, Conflict Resolution, Changing Global Power Relations, African Politics and Ethics in International Relations. During 2019 she published two books on the theory and practice of diplomacy: ‘Global Diplomacy and International Society’; and ‘Global South Perspectives on Diplomacy’. She joined Zayed University during January 2020, as Associate Professor of International Studies.

 

Samuel Ojo Oloruntoba is Associate Professor at the Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa and Visiting Scholar, Institute of African Studies, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. He obtained PhD in Political Science with specialization in International Political Economy of Trade from the University of Lagos, Nigeria. He was previously a Visiting Scholar at the Program of African Studies, Northwestern University, Evanston and a Fellow of Brown International Advanced Research Institute, Brown University, Rhode Island, United States of America. Oloruntoba is the author, editor and co-editor of several books including Regionalism and Integration in Africa: EU-ACP Economic Partnership Agreements and Euro-Nigeria Relations, published by Palgrave Macmillan, New York, USA, 2016 and co-editor with Toyin Falola, Palgrave Handbook of African Political Economy, 2020. Oloruntoba was the recipient of the National Research Foundation of South Africa Award in 2018 and Wangari Maathai Award for Innovative Research Leadership, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, United States of America, 2016. His research interests are in Political Economy of Development in Africa, Regional Integration, Democracy and Development, Global Governance of Trade and Finance, Civil Society Organisations and Politics of Natural Resources Governance.

Christopher Afoke Isike, PhD, is a Professor of African Politics and International Relations in the Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa. He is an immediate past Vice President (2016 to 2018) of the South African Association of Political Studies (SAAPS), and currently one of four Vice Presidents (2018 to 2020) of the International Political Science Association (IPSA). Professor Isike conducts research from an Africanist lens, and teaches international relations theory, strategic and security studies, and security theory at the University of Pretoria. His research interests include African soft power politics, peace and conflict studies, women and political representation in Africa, rethinking state formation in Africa, and politics in a digital era. A C2 rated researcher by the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa, Prof Isike has scores of publications in top national and international peer-reviewed journals including chapters in books published by reputable publishing houses globally. He is Editor-in-Chief of Africa’s foremost political science journal, Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies (2020 to 2024), and has been Editor of Ubuntu: Journal of Conflict and Social Transformation (2017 to 2020). He also serves on the editorial board of several reputable international journals, such as International Political Science Abstracts. Prof Isike consults for the UNFPA, UNICEF, UN Women and the KwaZulu-Natal provincial government on gender equality and women empowerment issues in the South Africa. In 2015, Prof Isike had a 12-months sabbatical stint as Senior Research Advisor at the Shell Petroleum Development Company in Nigeria where he was a programme monitoring and evaluation specialist in the External Relations Department of the company.

Webinar: Civil Society Organisations & Food Aid: Lessons for an ongoing crisis?, 23 June 2020, 10:00-12:00

Panellists:

  • Andrew Boraine (CEO – WCEDP and coordinator of the NGO-Government Food Relief Coordination Forum);
  • Mymoena Scholtz (Where Rainbows Meet Training and Development Foundation);
  • Henriette Abrahams (Bonteheuwel Street Committee);
  • TBC (Black Sash);
  • Andy Du Plessis (Food Forward);
  • Egbert Wessels (PEDI);
  • Nandi Msezane (C19 Peoples’ Coalition – Food Working Group). 

Panelists will discuss the recent mobilisation of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) around the food security problem under lockdown and explore how these organisations have worked together, and with government, in a valiant attempt to provide a shared solution to an acute problem in a time of crisis. The meeting will also explore what the legacy of this mass CSO/ NGO mobilisation might be for local food governance in South Africa.

Under lock down food insecurity has sky rocketed into an acute and visceral problem that can no longer be ignored.  In Cape Town alone it is estimated that 1.6 million people and approximately 500 000 households are likely to require some form of food aid. The demand for emergency food aid has stretched the infrastructure and networks of both government and CSOs. In addition to a few large and more medium sized NGOs, an army of hundreds, possibly thousands, of small and community based CSO/ NGOs have assisted, including CANs (Community Action Networks) and community food kitchens. New networks and governance platforms have sprung up to provide coordination. For example, weekly CSO-government food relief coordination meetings in the Western Cape have been facilitated by the Economic Development Partnership (EDP).

This is not only a tremendous human response to a desperate crisis but also a potentially significant moment in food governance in the country. Prior to the lockdown, one of the factors thought to be preventing greater momentum behind achieving the right to food in South Africa was the lack of CSO mobilisation on the issue. Although food insecurity was recognised as a problem by some academics, government officials and CSOs, it was previously a hidden problem that did not garner widespread public attention or demands for change. But has this now changed? What are the challenges facing these organisations? How can they play a sustainable role in food governance beyond the Covid crisis? What do they need to do this? How can they be supported?

This important webinar is an initiative of the Food Governance Community of Practice, a collaborative partnership of the Centre of Excellence in Food Security (CoE-FS) and the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation.

For more information about the webinar, visit the CoE-FS website.

SEMINAR: Roundtable Discussion on Kazakhstan and South Africa – Lessons of Building Constructive Public Dialogue as the basis of stability and prosperity

The Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan in South Africa
in conjunction with
The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn)
Cordially invites you to a Round Table
KAZAKHSTAN AND SOUTH AFRICA:
LESSONS OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTIVE PUBLIC DIALOGUE
AS THE BASIS OF STABILITY AND PROSPERITY

 

Date: Wednesday, 27 November 2019
Time: 14:00 – 16:00
Venue: Old College House Room 1-09, University of Pretoria (building 26 on attached map)
RSVPkirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

#FoodTalks SEMINAR: Student hunger and achieving the right to food for all, what role for universities?, 5 November 2019

The Centre for the Advancement of Scholarship (CAS) invites you to a #FoodTalks seminar on student hunger and achieving the right to food for all. The question being what role for universities? There will be academic, activist, and student perspectives brought by inputs from Professor Vishwas Satgar, Oluwafunmilola Adeniyi, and Elgin Hlaka. This event is organised in collaboration with the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Food Security, the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn), and the Human Economy Programme within CAS.

DATE Tuesday 5 November 2019
TIME 13:30 – 15:30
VENUE Old College House Seminar Lounge, 1-09, University of Pretoria
RSVP Cecelia Samson, 012 420 2653, cecelia.samson@up.ac.za

Too many students at our universities go hungry, negatively affecting their studies and their lives. At the same time, universities are sights of food selling and eating and are large buyers of food. There are great opportunities for universities to play a role in creating more sustainable and healthy food environments, for them to use their buying power to influence wider food systems,
and to inculcate healthy food production, processing and eating habits, not only in what they teach, but also in how they operate.

This #FoodTalks seminar will help us understand the food challenges and opportunities at universities, and to share from existing initiatives that are responding to these challenges.

Food talks to us at many levels, touching on important aspects of our lives and society. This is a continuation of a series of seminars that is bringing together leading thinkers and practitioners in the sector to share knowledge, and create a space to talk about the current food system and how we can move to a socially and ecologically regenerative, just and nourishing food system in South Africa and the region.

 

More details on this event can be found here.

SEMINAR REPORT: Africa’s development challenges are not due to a lack of resources but a lack of management, 21 August 2019

Seminar presentation by South-Korean Ambassador to South-Africa, Dr Jong-Dae Park

GovInn recently hosted South Korean Ambassador to South Africa, His Excellency Dr Jong-Dae Park, at a seminar on development in Africa. The seminar, held on 21st August 2019, was attended by representatives of diplomatic missions in Pretoria from various countries, university staff, students and GovInn researchers. Dean in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Pretoria, Prof. Vasu Reddy, welcomed Dr Park whose paper, based on his recent book Re-inventing Development in Africa: Linking Africa to the Korean Development Model, focused on lessons for Africa from South Korea’s successful development model.

Dr Park challenged common explanations of underdevelopment in Africa such as colonialism, ethnicity and neopatrimonialism; drawing comparisons between Africa under European colonial rule and Korea under Japanese colonial rule. Dr Park insisted that the “psychological yoke”, under which it is believed Africa is incapable to progress and inevitably destined to remain underdeveloped, be broken. In order to achieve transformation, African countries need a strong sense of nation, prominent and proactive governments committed to development and development-mindedness of the people. According to Dr Park, “Such radical transformation could be achieved only if the whole nation, acquires development minded focus, supported by the active role of the state. What makes institutions work are the actions of people who uphold them”. The successes of the Korean economic and developmental model, according to Dr Park was based on ”four cornerstones” including, land reform, empowerment of the people, educational reform and governmental reform. Additionally, the Korean development model was founded on a strong development mind-set in the name of “attaining better life and modernization of the nation” and by an egalitarian spirit instilled in the people. For Africa, Dr Park recommended initiatives focused on four areas (a) macroeconomic stability; (b) effective industrialization; (c) human capacity development; and (d) reinvigoration of the market mechanism (economic principles having precedence over political considerations).

 

Report by Anetta Oksiutycz-Munyawiri

GOVINN WEEK SEMINAR: Pragmatic peace-making for innovative governance and social change, 26 September 2019

With Matt Meyer

Reviewing historical examples from governmental practices in Zambia, Tanzania, Mozambique, Eritrea and elsewhere, Meyer will lead a discussion on the connections between civil resistance, social change, and democracy in this interactive seminar. With reviews of contemporary struggles in Western Sahara and the Cameroons/Ambazonia, fundamental questions of decolonization, apartheid economics, and the roll of education will be addressed. Strategic questions relating to violence/nonviolence, patriarchy, white supremacy, identity issues, and the connections between ideology and pragmatism will also be covered.

DATE: 26 September 2019

TIME: 10:00 – 13:00

VENUE: Future Africa Campus

 

The Governance Innovation Week 2019: Programme

What – This week will bring critical scholars and practitioners together to debate and plan the future of governance and governance innovation in Africa and the world.
When – 25 – 27 September 2019
Where – Future Africa, University of Pretoria

NB: this list is non-exhaustive and will be updated continuously.

 

KEYNOTE PANEL:

Emancipatory governance: Views from the ground

Everisto Benyera, Marc Wegerif, Chris Nshimbi and Lebohang Liepollo Pheko
Facilitator: Quraysha Sooliman

25 September 2019, 18:00,
RSVP: Kirsty Agnew, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

A case for challenging conventional wisdom on governance?

with Dr Catherine Biira (Institute For Regional
Integration and Development, Catholic University of
Eastern Africa)

26 September 2019, 18:00
RSVP: Kirsty Agnew, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za


Workshops and Playshops:

The State of Food Governance in South Africa

25 September 2019
RSVP: Camilla Adelle, camilla.adelle@up.ac.za

More details here.

The objective of this one-day workshop will be to continue the existing policy debate on food insecurity in South Africa. It will review and discuss what is known about the policies and programmes relating to food and nutrition security at national and local levels of governance; identify the main knowledge gaps; and then debate the major issues preventing effective food security governance in the country.

Governance from Below: The Role of Non-state Actors in Africa

25 September 2019
RSVP: Kirsty Nepomuceno, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

More details here.

During this one-day event, which forms part of GovInn Week 2019, we will be exploring who the non-state actors in Africa are, the kind of power they hold, the interaction between non-state and state actors, and what relevance they have in terms of governance. Key debates on this day will be around the changing nature of the state, the emergence (or emerging interest) in non-state actors in governance, and the implications of these emerging actors for the future of the state and governance in Africa. Experts in the field will be sharing about emerging non-state actors in the mining industry, health sector, civil society sector and in relation to the sustainable development goals. The relationships between the state and mining companies, traditional leaders, healers, midwives and indigenous minorities will be explored. Presentations will be interspersed with an interactive participatory conference approach, where everyone in the room will get to share their views!

Pragmatic peacemaking for innovative governance and social change

with Matt Meyer

26 September 2019, 10:00 – 13:00

RSVP: Kirsty Nepomuceno, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

Reviewing historical examples from governmental practices in Zambia, Tanzania, Mozambique, Eritrea and elsewhere, Meyer will lead a discussion on the connections between civil resistance, social change, and democracy in this interactive seminar.

See more details here.

The Future of Governance in Africa – A Serious Playshop

26 – 27 September 2019, Invited participants only

What futures for governance in Africa?

 This 1 and a ½ day event brings together a diversity of participants from Africa who will engage in exploring issues related to governance in Africa beyond the conventional dichotomy between democracy and autocracy. Its purpose is to sense and make sense of what the present holds using the lights shed by exploring the future. It is designed to nurture a future-oriented perspective and create a collective knowledge on what governance could look like on the continent. This event takes the form of a serious “playshop” combining causal layered analysis and the futures triangle, which will help unveiling potential pockets of the future of governance in the present.

 

Ecological Economics and Governance of Natural Resources

27 September 2019

See more details here.

The session will be organized around different case studies on water and wildlife management in Africa. The presenters are current CEEPA doctoral students who will bring to the  discussion their current research questions and progress. Their methodological approaches are largely inspired by the ecological economics framework. However, the GovInn week provides an opportunity to discuss such approaches with a wider and more multidisciplinary audience.

Governance from below: The role of non-state actors in Africa

Governance from below: The role of non-state actors in Africa
Wednesday, 25 September

University of Pretoria’s Future Africa campus

During this one-day event, which forms part of GovInn Week 2019, we will be exploring who the non-state actors in Africa are, the kind of power they hold, the interaction between non-state and state actors, and what relevance they have in terms of governance. Key debates on this day will be around the changing nature of the state, the emergence (or emerging interest) in non-state actors in governance, and the implications of these emerging actors for the future of the state and governance in Africa. Experts in the field will be sharing about emerging non-state actors in the mining industry, health sector, civil society sector and in relation to the sustainable development goals. The relationships between the state and mining companies, traditional leaders, healers, midwives and indigenous minorities will be explored. Presentations will be interspersed with an interactive participatory conference approach, where everyone in the room will get to share their views!

There are still some places open for this event. If you want to join us, RSVP to cori.wielenga@up.ac.za.

Seminar: Working toward SDG 16.1: Freedom from Violence in (South) Africa, 5 September 2019

South Africa is in the process of completing its first National Report within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in addition to presenting its Voluntary National Review at the UN High Level Political Forum in New York in July. The University of Pretoria has over the past six months been working with Stats SA to contribute to South Africa’s reports. In this symposium, scholars who have been involved in the process from the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the Freedom from Violence programme based in the Law Faculty, will provide insights related to the first target of the Goal – aimed at significantly reducing all forms of violence.  The presentations will range from the interconnections with South Africa’s National Development Plan, its recent White Paper on Safety and Security, to broader interventions extending across the continent, exploring the possibilities for broader armed violence reduction in post-conflict societies, and some of the challenges posed by a particular form of peace-building initiative Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR) initiatives.
Thursday 5 September 2019
10:00 – 13:00
Room 2-21, Law Faculty, University of Pretoria

Workshop Invitation: The State of Food Governance in South Africa, Wednesday, 25 September, 08:30-17:30

We would like to invite you to a workshop on ‘The State of Food Governance in South Africa’ on 25 September at the Future Africa Campus of the University of Pretoria. This event is part of the GovInn Week organised every two years by the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation.

The objective of this one-day workshop will be to continue the existing policy debate on food insecurity in South Africa. It will review and discuss what is known about the policies and programmes relating to food and nutrition security at national and local levels of governance; identify the main knowledge gaps; and then debate the major issues preventing effective food security governance in the country.

South Africa is food secure at the national level. However, food insecurity and malnutrition at the household level are high and the country has a poor record with regards to the prevalence of stunting, obesity and diet-related non-communicable diseases. Since 2002, a range of policies have attempted to address these high levels of food insecurity, yet food insecurity and malnutrition persist, which raises core concerns about the South African food system and its governance.

Please join us to discuss this critical policy problem currently facing South Africa. A draft programme can be found here.

RSVP by 5th September by following the link below

For more information please contact: camilla.adelle@up.ac.za, 083 260 4703