Book Review : Migration and regional integration in West Africa: A borderless ECOWAS.

GovInn Research Fellow Prudence Nkomo has published a book review in the journal African Insight, looking at Adebusuyi Isaac Adeniran’s book, Migration and regional integration in West Africa: A borderless ECOWAS. The review was published in the December 2018 edition of the journal.

Although the migration process examined is largely informal, the resulting integration proves that a regionally integrated ECOWAS is feasible – and that it should be people-centric and not state-centric. This is why this book significantly contributes to efforts to understand the role of informal migration in the realisation of a regionally integrated ECOWAS. Academics, policy makers and development workers will benefit greatly from the book and it will be an invaluable resource to policy makers in ECOWAS.

Prudence Nkomo

Prudence Nkomo

Prudence is currently completing her masters at the University of Pretoria, focusing on trans-frontier conservation areas, local communities, inequality and migration.

To read the full review, visit the Sabinet website.

Launch of the Economic Report on Africa 2017, 02 November, 14:00

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) invite you to the launch of the Economic Report on Africa 2017.

Please find the invitation below, and access the program HERE.

ERA Launch flier

UFS/AS Young African Scholarship Award

 

ScholarAward

The Legacy of Armed Conflicts: Southern African and Comparative Perspectives, 28-29 July

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn), in cooperation with the German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA), invites submissions for a two-day workshop on the legacy of armed conflicts: Southern African and comparative perspectives.

Achieving stable peace, building accountable state institutions and (re)establishing trust are core challenges in the aftermath of an armed conflict. While violent conflicts are disruptive, they also offer opportunities for political and social change. However, the passage from conflict to sustainable peace is a complicated process. Formal and informal processes taking place during the war and in its immediate aftermath can have profound long-term implications. Even in Southern Africa, which has been heralded as a ‘success story’ of peacebuilding, past wars continue to shape politics and societies in many ways.

More information on this event can be found  here.

Timeline
Submission of paper abstracts 30 April
Notification of acceptance 15 May
Submission of papers 15 July
Conference 28-29 July

Contact
Dr Giulia Piccolino
Post-doctoral Research Fellow
GIGA Institute of African Affairs
giulia.piccolino@giga-hamburg.de

Dr John Kotsopoulos
Research fellow
Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn)
University of Pretoria
john.kotsopoulos@governanceinnovation.org

Regions without borders

Call for Abstracts for the 33rd International Geographical Congress: Shaping our Harmonious Worlds

Regions without borders

Call for abstracts

 

 

“Sociocultural Encounters in Geography: Borders, Borderlands, Grassroots Non-State Actors and the Southern African Regional Integration Project”

The geographical and socio-economic landscapes of the contiguous border areas in Southern African suggest de facto processes of regional integration. The historical, socio-economic and cultural interactions, enhanced by geography, that characterise these borderlands form sub-regions that not only defy border controls but also achieve alternative processes of regional integration. This has not received much scholarly attention and recognition from policy makers. Therefore, this session takes, as its point of departure, the debates around borders, borderlands, sub-and regional integration and aims to interrogate the place of local, grassroots non-State actors and their rich historical, socioeconomic and cultural interactions facilitated by geographic proximity in Southern Africa’s borderlands, in the SADC’s regional integration project. Hence the questions; do “spaces of flows” replace “spaces of places” in Southern Africa’s borderlands? Are economic regions outside formal state organisation likely to emerge in these contiguous border areas? Contrary to top down approaches to regional integration, the session will explore alternative approaches to regional integration in the SADC and advance perspectives that question current thinking and conceptualization of regional integration in the Southern African region and in Africa, in general. Several questions shall, therefore, be explored such as: how does the role of grassroots non-State actors in the Southern African region compare with other parts of the world?

SUBMISSION PROCEDURES:
Please register and submit your abstract (200-250 words) at the IGC China 33rd International Geographical Congress website by following the link below. On the Abstract Submission page your “Intended Session” will be listed under Political Geography. Check the “Sociocultural Encounters in Geography: Borders, Borderlands, Grassroots Non-State Actors and the Southern African Integration Project” box and proceed with your submission.

WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION:
http://www.igc2016.org/dct/page/70047

DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING ABSTRACTS:
15 February 2016

CONFRENCE DATES
21-25 August 2016, Beijing China

NOTIFICATION OF THE RESULTS OF THE ABSTRACT REVIEW:
16 April 2016

For further information please contact:

Dr. Christopher C. Nshimbi
Research Fellow & Deputy Director: Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn)
Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria
Tel: +27 12 420 4152
Email: chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org; christopher.nshimbi@up.ac.za

Or

Dr. Inocent Moyo
Research Fellow: Department of Geography
UNISA, Florida Campus
Tel: +27 72 106 2632
Email: minnoxa@yahoo.com

Regions without borders

Call for Abstracts for the 33rd International Geographical Congress: Shaping our Harmonious Worlds

banner 04 15 0.2

Call for Abstracts

“Autochthony, Allochthony and Belonging: Migration, Xenophobia and Social Cohesion in the Southern African Region”

Migration is not new in the Southern African region. Its long history dates back to the late 19th century into the colonial, post-independence and post-Cold War eras, and into the late 1980s and early 1990s when most economies in Southern Africa underwent neoliberal economic reforms and structural adjustments. The economic reforms coincided with the end of apartheid in South Africa. South Africa’s emergence as the economic hub of Southern Africa coupled with the long history of migration across Southern Africa makes South Africa a destination of choice for various categories of migrants including labour, informal traders, medical, education and training, cultural and kinship relations, etc. The post-reform and post-apartheid period has thus witnessed increased immigration into South Africa from Southern and other parts of Africa. The increase in numbers of immigrants in South Africa has created tensions and hostilities directed towards immigrants. The African immigrants in South Africa have thus been constructed as the problematic new comers who take away jobs from South Africans and strain the national socioeconomic infrastructure, pressuring government and limiting its ability to provide essential socioeconomic services and employment to its citizens. This social topography, which has elevated South African citizens and led to the relegation of immigrants to the subaltern, with calls for their evisceration and interpellation, partlyexplains the so-called xenophobia and discourse around xenophobic attacks currently prevalent in South Africa since the early 2000s. While foreigners and agencies such as the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) brand targeted attacks on foreigners and their businesses by South African citizens as xenophobia, South African authorities rather brand such attacks as acts of criminality, or even ‘Afrophobia’, and not xenophobic. Against this background, this session proposes to (a) gain a properunderstanding and conceptualisation of the notion xenophobia and (b) deliberate ways in which social cohesion can be promoted to encourage harmony between foreigners and South African citizens. The dearth of scholarly engagement in academia and policy attention in government circles around regional migration, xenophobia, local integration and social cohesion in Southern Africa makes engaging in this discourse imperative.

SUBMISSION PROCEDURES:
Please register and submit your abstract (200-250 words) at the IGC China 33rd International Geographical Congress website by following the link below. On the Abstract Submission page your “Intended Session” will be listed under Political Geography. Check the “Autochthony, Allochthony and Belonging: Migration, Xenophobia and Social Cohesion in the Southern African Region” box and proceed with your submission.

WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION:

http://www.igc2016.org/dct/page/70047

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING ABSTRACTS:
15 February 2016

CONFRENCE DATES
21-25 August 2016, Beijing China

NOTIFICATION OF THE RESULTS OF THE ABSTRACT REVIEW:
16 April 2016

For further information please contact:
Dr. Inocent Moyo
Research Fellow: Department of Geography
UNISA, Florida Campus
Tel: +27 72 106 2632
Email: minnoxa@yahoo.com

Or

Dr. Christopher C. Nshimbi
Research Fellow & Deputy Director: Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn)
Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria
Tel: +27 12 420 4152
Email: chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org; christopher.nshimbi@up.ac.za

Master in European Studies: Transnational and Global Perspectives

Call for students: interdisciplinary Master of European Studies: Transnational and Global Perspectives at the University of Leuven in Belgium

MAES

The University of Leuven is organising the interdisciplinary Master of European Studies: Transnational and Global Perspectives (MAES), as well as the Summer School ‘Europe Inside Out’. MAES’ four specialised modules – ‘European History, Diversity and Culture‘, ‘EU External Relations’, ‘Globalising Europe’ and ‘Europe-Asia’ – allow the students to understand the increasingly complex European and global dynamics.

The MAES program already attract students from 40 countries, including an increasing number of students from Asia and the US, and would be pleased to welcome even more international students. Students may be interested to learn that KU Leuven was very well placed in the Times Higher Education Ranking of 2015/2016, ranked 35th worldwide and 5th on the European continent. During the Master of European Studies in Leuven, students follow courses offered by renowned scholars as well as high-ranking practitioners, including the President of the Court of Justice of the EU, the chief-negotiator of the European Commission in the recent Paris Climate negotiations, and an advisor to one of the Vice-Presidents of the European Commission. Students will furthermore benefit from guest lectures by European politicians, diplomats and officials such as former European Council President Van Rompuy; visits to European and transatlantic institutions in Brussels, Luxembourg and Strasbourg; and cultural excursions to World War I battlefields and the historical medieval cities of Flanders.

More information on the programme can be found on the website: http://ghum.kuleuven.be/ces.

Social investments: The kind-hearted soul of capitalism?

By Frank Mattheis GovInn Senior Fellow

As the eyes of the British political elite are all on Scotland this week the report of the Social Impact Investment Taskforce, initiated by Mr Cameron last year, became second-tier news at best.

Yet, so-called social investments are the biggest trend among experts and practitioners trying to polish the dented reputation of capitalism. The Taskforce’s chair, venture capitalist Sir Ronald Cohen talks of uncovering the “invisible heart of the market”. The trick is to reconcile greed and ethics by creating more profits for capital being invested to resolve social problems. The Taskforce thus recommends all sorts of regulatory changes to financially reward those doing good for society. But simply, governments need to define the costs of undesired social phenomena. They then can create social impact bonds to offer investors appealing yields if the problem is solved with their money. If the measures of the bonds succeed in a given goal – e.g. preventing ex-convicts from reoffending – the state pays out returns from the spared social spending.

The idea seems brilliant because it is so simple. But there is a fine line between simple and simplistic. The core mechanism of social investment is to transforming reduction in national spending into private revenues.

Consequently, the ‘new paradigm’ presented in the report translates into an entire re-definition of public goods. The most urgent social problems are not identified by the society itself but according to how much of a drain they represent to public budgets. How much attention illiteracy or domestic violence receives would be determined by the yield assessment of investors.