Presentations from “Beyond GDP in Africa: Innovative ideas for a regional dashboard”

On 28-29 October 2014, GovInn, in partnership with the Sustainability Institute,  hosted a workshop that brought together academics and practitioners from statistical offices from Sub-Saharan Africa to identify practical solutions to measure well being and prosperity and move beyond numerical indicators such as GDP.

The title of the workshop was ‘Beyond-GDP in Africa: Innovative Ideas for a Regional Dashboard.’ Its goal was to take stock of the various criticisms raised against the gross domestic product (GDP) as a measure of economic progress and to propose a way forward for African countries.

Read and download the presentations given at the workshop: 

Why it’s time to leave GDP behind, by Robert Costanza

The GCRO BAROMETER 2014, by Darlington Mushongera

MEASURING DECENT WORK INDICATORS AND WORK STATISTICS, by Coffi Agossou

Environmental Economic Accounting Water Resource Accounting for South Africa, by Robert Parry

Gross National Happiness (GNH) in Bhutan, by Lise Pretorius

Why reversing Africa’s Resource Curse requires calculating natural capital accounts and ecological debt, by Patrick Bond

Update on the UN System of Environmental-Economic Accounting, by Mandy Driver

Developing a Diagnostic Tool and Policy Instrument for the Realisation of Decent Work, by Edward Webster

Beyond GDP: Towards a composite well-being index The case of the Green Economy Index , by Anton Nahman

Beyond GDP in Africa: Day 1 summary

Click here to download the workshop official statement 

The Will to Integrate: South Africa’s Responses to Regional Migration from the SADC Region

The African Development Review published a new paper by GovInn Chris Nshimbi and Lorenzo Fioramonti on how South Africa is responding to regional migration.

Abstract

This paper surveys frameworks of labour migration in southern Africa and determines South Africa’s policy responses to inflows of migrants from seven neighbouring countries. Legislations, policy reports and scientific publications on migration were thoroughly reviewed and interviews and correspondence with key policymakers were conducted. Statistical analyses of data on foreign worker recruitments and permits issued by South Africa’s Department of Home Affairs were also performed. The absence of a migration protocol in southern Africa suggests SADC Members have not implemented the African Union’s migration policy basic guidelines. Two systems coexist in southern Africa that complicate migration governance: a South Africa-managed bilateral migration policy, and aspirations for a formal SADC-managed migration policy. Bilateral agreements between South Africa and neighbours have established a labour migration system that dims prospects for a regional migration policy. SACU Members could establish a two-tier policy to achieve free movement while maintaining managed migration policy outside SACU. An official multilateral migration governance mechanism would serve SADC better than the current ad-hoc measures.

Read the full paper on the African Development Review

Beyond-GDP in Africa: Innovative Ideas for a Regional Dashboard

On October 28-29 2014, GovInn, in partnership with the Sustainability Institute,  hosted a workshop that brought together academics and practitioners from statistical offices from Sub-Saharan Africa to identify practical solutions to measure well being and prosperity and move beyond numerical indicators such as GDP.

The title of the workshop was ‘Beyond-GDP in Africa: Innovative Ideas for a Regional Dashboard.’ Its goal was to take stock of the various criticisms raised against the gross domestic product (GDP) as a measure of economic progress and to propose a way forward for African countries.

After two days of presentations and deliberations, the participants compiled a list of recommendations with a view to identifying a practical roadmap for the translation of the ‘beyond GDP’ debate into policy reforms throughout Africa.

Click here to download the presentations at the workshop

Click here to download the workshop official statement

Learn about Beyond GDP in Africa research project and about GovInn research on New Economy

Names and democracy in Southern Africa: the tale of two presidents

GovInn Researcher Chris Nshimbi compares the democratization processes of Zambia and Malawi on his latest post for the Nordic Africa Institut of Uppsala, Sweden.

“A few days after celebrating 50 years of independence in October, Zambia relived a sad history: the death of a second incumbent president to die in office in the space of six years.

Zambia is once again appearing as a beacon of peace in a violent and conflict ridden continent. However, the proof shall be in the transition with elections to be held 90 days after the president’s demise.

There are interesting comparisons to be made with neighbouring Malawi—the story less told about the successes of the evolving democratization in southern Africa.

Southern Africa needs committed politicians and senior bureaucrats that transcend personal interests to apply the principles of democracy and seek the firm establishment of state institutions.”

Read the full article on the Nordic Africa Development Policy Forum

Creative ideas on migration will open the doors to growth -Business Day SA-

“South Africa is the destination of many workers from the rest of Africa and from the rest of the world. We know that about 7% of SA’s workforce is foreign. More than 38% of workers in gold mines are non-South African citizens and more than 22% of mine workers in all sectors hail from Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland and Mozambique.

Data are sketchy and grossly underestimate the phenomenon. Many migrants are employed in informal positions, with precarious jobs, both in terms of safety and social security. Most undocumented migrant workers are poorly captured by official statistics. By all means, migrant workers are a fundamental factor in SA’s economic development. But how supportive and reliable is the present administrative and legislative framework?

What we need is a simple and clear framework to allow citizens of neighbouring countries to seek work and business opportunities in SA. We may even want to consider experimenting with free movement, for instance, within the Southern African Customs Union. In the European Union (EU), where free movement is a reality, most people have not relocated to other countries. As they benefit from clear arrangements that allow them to return regularly to their home country, they need not relocate permanently.”

In his regular column on Business Day, Lorenzo Fioramonti discusses how South Africa could transform its position of African immigration hub into an economic opportunity.

Read the full article on Business Day

Partnership to Explore New Funding Sources for Innovators

leddaThe European Social Innovation Research website features the LEDDA partnership this week.

This first-of-its-kind partnership is envisioned as a global, diverse set of academic, civil society, government, business, and philanthropy groups focused on ushering a new, parallel economic system through the development and pilot trial phases.

says Georg Mildenberger in his article.

“The economic system, called the Local Economic Direct Democracy Association (LEDDA) framework, or synonymously, LEDDA economic direct democracy, represents a rethinking of economic purpose and money. Among other things, it uses money as a democratic voting tool, and distributes voting power by increasing and equalizing incomes. This is a local economic system designed to complement and compete with existing systems within local (city or regional) economies.

A LEDDA itself is a membership-based, community benefit association open to residents, businesses, schools, nonprofits, local governments, public services, and others that choose to participate. Each LEDDA governs its own local framework through an online direct democracy process, and all LEDDAs are networked together within a global association.

The LEDDA framework is comprehensive, including as elements a novel local electronic currency, intellectual property pool, financial system, online direct democracy governance system, socially responsible business model, and buy local program. According to Boik, who outlines the framework in his 2014 book Economic Direct Democracy: A Framework to End Poverty and Maximize Well-Being, “the framework diversifies, strengthens, and infuses a local economy with democracy, and in so doing empowers residents to address local and global issues of interest.”

One key characteristic is that the LEDDA framework employs new motivations for economic decision-making. Rather than focusing attention on strict self-interest (by rewarding individuals who strive for higher corporate profits and investor returns), it focuses attention on cooperation, via a process of maximizing community well-being. A LEDDA assesses and forecasts social, economic, and environmental well-being using modern data collection and computer modeling tools. It uses the results to guide decision-making, especially in the LEDDA financial system, called the Crowd-Based Financial System (CBFS)”.

Know more about the CBFS and read the full article on the SIR website

(FGV), in Rio de Janeiro (22-24 October) with meeting organiser Inês Sousa from the International Intelligence Unit of FGV.

ATLANTIC FUTURE in action: Security in the Atlantic Space (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

ATLANTIC FUTURE second plenary meeting took place at FUNDAÇAO GETÚLIO VARGAS, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 22 to 24 October 2014. The three day event provided an opportunity for the Consortium to meet and discuss the results of the research, review the progress of the Project and to discuss next steps. Researchers Frank Mattheis and John Kotsopoulos represented GovInn at the Symposium.

 

(FGV), in Rio de Janeiro (22-24 October) with meeting organiser Inês Sousa from the International Intelligence Unit of FGV.

Frank Mattheis (left) and John Kotsopoulos (right) at the ATLANTIC FUTURE second plenary meeting at FUNDAÇAO GETÚLIO VARGAS (FGV), in Rio de Janeiro (22-24 October) with meeting organiser Inês Sousa from the International Intelligence Unit of FGV

 

 

If you missed it, re-live the meeting “Security in the Atlantic Space” on youtube:

Lorenzo Fioramonti presents his latest book in Heidelberg

Lorenzo Fioramonti presents his new book in Heidelberg, Germany

Numbers dominate global politics and, as a result, our everyday lives. Credit ratings steer financial markets and can make or break the future of entire nations. GDP drives our economies. Stock market indices flood our media and national debates. Statistical calculations define how we deal with climate change, poverty and sustainability. But what is behind these numbers?
GovInn director Lorenzo Fioramonti presented his new book at the German American Institute in Heidelberg, Germany on 14 October 2014.

In How Numbers Rule the World, Lorenzo Fioramonti reveals the hidden agendas underpinning the use of statistics and those who control them. Most worryingly, he shows how numbers have been used as a means to reinforce the grip of markets on our social and political life, curtailing public participation and rational debate.Lorenzo Fioramonti presents his latest book in Heidelberg

Lorenzo Fioramonti presents his latest book in Heidelberg

Lorenzo Fioramonti presents his latest book in Heidelberg

“Competing with Capitalism to Maximize Well-Being” LEDDA framework on Thruth Out

What would you do to reinvent capitalism, to make it less destructive and more focused on what people really need?
It’s not that the benefits of capitalism are undesirable – jumbo jets and smart phones are sheer wonders – it’s that the collateral damage is growing untenable. Democracy and the commons are being sold off to the highest bidders.

GovInn Director Lorenzo Fioramonti and John Boik, creator of the Principled Societies Project present on TruthOut the Local Economic Direct Democracy (LEDDA) framework.

A LEDDA, Local Economic Direct Democracy Association
, is a membership-based, community benefit association open to residents, businesses, schools, nonprofits, local governments, public services, and others that choose to participate. The LEDDA framework is the local economic system – comprised of software, policies, standards, and procedures – that a new LEDDA implements. Once live, the membership can alter the local framework as desired.

In effect, the framework offers a secondary level of organization on top of an existing local economy.

Each LEDDA governs its own local framework through an online process of direct democracy, and all LEDDAs are networked together within a global association, which is also governed through online direct democracy. Thus the focus is both local and global.

The LEDDA framework integrates and builds on numerous initiatives already existing in cities and regions around the world, including buy local, local currency, open source, crowdfunding, socially responsible business, open data, smart cities, and participatory democracy. It contains its own monetary system, which issues a local electronic currency, called the token. And it has its own financial system, called the Crowd-Based Financial System (CBFS), which resembles crowdfunding and participatory budgeting. The framework is sophisticated, and there are many more elements.

The LEDDA framework is synonymous with LEDDA economic direct democracy, an economic system that offers all participants roughly equal and direct opportunity to influence their local economy. The framework infuses a local economy with democracy, in part by using money as a voting tool and by increasing and equalizing family incomes.

A computer simulation model has been published that illustrates the process. Inflation-adjusted mean family income more than doubles during the twenty-eight-year simulation period. As incomes rise, they become more equal. By the end of the simulation, every member family receives a pre-tax, take-home income equivalent to about $107,000, just above the 90th percentile of baseline income. Even very wealthy families would see a small direct gain.

By the end of the simulation, the LEDDA, located in an averaged-size US county, channels the equivalent of more than $2 billion dollars annually toward local businesses, schools, public services, and nonprofit organizations. Tax revenues for the county markedly rise. With such abundant resources, and democratic control over funding decisions, a community could remake its economy into one that best suits its needs.

The LEDDA framework is still theoretical, and the partnership is just forming. Over time, we hope to provide answers to the host of questions that such an approach naturally raises. In this, we invite your participation.

Imagine a democracy-infused economic system that maximizes well-being. The long-run social and environmental returns might be valued in the trillions, thousands of times greater than the costs of development and pilot trials. Isn’t it worth the effort?

Read the full article on TruthOut

How Moving Beyond GDP may Help Fight Poverty in Africa

In this policy brief for CROP (Comparative Research Programme on Poverty) GovInn director Lorenzo Fioramonti explains how alternative indicators are likely to highlight the important contribution of social cohesion and natural welfare to economic development, thus helping to eradicate poverty in the continent.

Click here to read the CROP Poverty Briefs in full