‘Food sovereignty: shifting debates on democratic food governance’, by Koen Dekeyser and Lorenzo Fioramonti, 26.01.2018

GovInn’s fellow Koen Dekeyser and Director Lorenzo Fioramonti published, together with Lise Korsten, the article ‘Food sovereignty: shifting debates on democratic food governance‘ in the journal Food Security.

This article develops the concept of food sovereignty while it critically reflects on its present status and future trajectories. The concept of food sovereignty provides an alternative framework for solutions to the human and ecological consequences of industrial food systems. While the concept of food sovereignty gains traction at international levels, including at the United Nations, its lack of conceptual clarity contributes to a variety of often diverging interpretations. This frequently constrains practical implementation and weakens its potential as an alternative paradigm to food governance. At the same time, food sovereignty thought is shifting beyond its initial agrarian focus to embrace whole food systems, which includes the role of consumers and urban areas.

Read the full article here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12571-017-0763-2

ATLAS ‘Rural Africa in motion. Dynamics and drivers of migration South of the Sahara’ by CIRAD, FAO & GovInn, 02.11.2017

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation, FAO & CIRAD launched the first atlas on rural migration in sub-Saharan Africa in Rome, Italy.

Through a series of maps and in-depth case studies, the 20 authors of the atlas, representing different research institutions, think tanks and international organizations from and outside Africa, explore the complexity of the interrelated causes that drive people in Africa to leave their homes. They shed light on regional migration dynamics and perspectives and foster understanding of rural migration.

 

More information about the launch can be found here.
The atlas can be downloaded here. 

“But where are the workers? How the youth entrepreneur model fails in Africa”, by Pierre Girard, December 2017

GovInn and CIRAD research fellow and PhD student Pierre Girard wrote an article for the University of the Witwatersrand’s Global Labour Column at the end of 2017. His article, entitled “But where are the workers? How the youth entrepreneur model fails in Africa” looks at the institutional structures in place to support youth employment in Africa, and where the continent is failing to ensure that entrepreneurs on the continent are properly supported.

The figures are now well known: 375 million young people will reach working age in Sub-Saharan Africa by 2030, and for many their livelihoods will depend mainly on the rural economy (Losch, 2016). Facing the massive generation of activity required by these demographic dynamics, entrepreneurship has become the leitmotiv of many donors’ and NGOs’ programmes and projects, as well as public policies. According to them, the multiplication of entrepreneurs can meet the employment challenge in the African countryside.

 

The article can be read in its entirety here. Or see below for the PDF version.

 

But where are the workers? by Pierre Girard

Article ‘The EU-Africa summit is now the AU-EU summit. Why the upgrade matters’, by Frank Mattheis and John Kotsopolous, 04.12.2017

GovInn’s Senior Researchers Frank Mattheis and John Kotsopoulos published the article ‘The EU-Africa summit is now the AU-EU summit. Why the upgrade matters‘ in The Conversation

African and European heads of government gathered last week in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, for their 5th summit since 2000. For the first time, the African Union (AU) rather than “Africa”, officially appears as the European Union’s partner. While plenty has been discussed about youth, migration, security and governance less is being said about the shift from an EU-Africa to an AU-EU summit. Is this just a case of semantics? After all, the AU has been the key organiser of these triennial summits since they started in 2000. Or are there larger implications? We think there are.

 

Read the full article here: https://theconversation.com/the-eu-africa-summit-is-now-the-au-eu-summit-why-the-upgrade-matters-88185

‘Informal Immigrant Traders in Johannesburg: The Scorned Cornerstone in the Southern African Development Community Integration Project’ by Chris Nshimbi, 21.11.2017

GovInn’s Co-Director Chris Nshimbi published the book chapter ‘Informal Immigrant Traders in Johannesburg: The Scorned Cornerstone in the Southern African Development Community Integration Project‘ together with Inocent Moyo in Africa Now!.

Taking the case of informal cross-border traders from Southern Africa in Johannesburg, human mobility is discussed as one of four productive factors that are key to regional integration. Employing three levels of analysis—regional, national and local—discussion is confined to economically active persons. Key Southern African Development Community (SADC) instruments relating to human mobility are also discussed. Existing and corresponding national and local legislation, by-laws, policies and practices are investigated to highlight the extent to which SADC members implement regional instruments. Using in-depth interviews with informal cross-border traders in Johannesburg from SADC countries, the findings show the absence of supportive legal-institutional regulatory regimes to promote the activities of immigrant traders. This demonstrates that an important element in the SADC integration project is unwelcome or ignored.

 

Please find the full chapter here: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-62443-3_17

policy brief_TJ_image

Policy Brief: ‘The end of the global transitional justice project: What future for justice in Africa?’ by Cori Wielenga and Chris Nshimbi

GovInn’s latest policy brief: ‘The end of the global transitional justice project: What future for justice in Africa?’ by Govinn’s Senior Researcher Cori Wielenga and Deputy Director Chris Nshimbi

This policy brief makes the case for the provision of more appropriate support to the mechanisms and forms of justice practiced in communities by people at the grassroots during periods of transition, instead of looking at how to integrate informal justice systems into the existing normative transitional justice framework

Read the full policy brief below.

9421 UP ISPA Policy Brief HR

Launch of the Economic Report on Africa 2017, 02 November, 14:00

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) invite you to the launch of the Economic Report on Africa 2017.

Please find the invitation below, and access the program HERE.

ERA Launch flier

‘The Human Side of Regions: Informal Cross-border Traders in the Zambia–Malawi–Mozambique Growth Triangle and Prospects for Integrating Southern Africa’, by Chris Nshimbi, 23.10.2017

GovInn’s Co-Director Chris Nshimbi published the article ‘The Human Side of Regions: Informal Cross-border Traders in the Zambia–Malawi–Mozambique Growth Triangle and Prospects for Integrating Southern Africa‘ in the Journal of Borderlands Studies.

This paper examines the activities of informal cross-border traders (ICBTs) in the contiguous borderlands of Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique, in order to determine the replicability and feasibility of the growth triangle phenomenon, which was imported as a concept for economic development from Southeast Asia. It also seeks to establish whether ICBTs can satisfy their economic needs from cross-border trade. Apart from the thorough review of relevant literature, participant observations, face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions were deployed to collect the data for the analysis contained in the paper. Primary data from the fieldwork conducted at various locations in the borderlands is qualitatively and statistically analyzed. ICBTs in these areas include affiliates of traders’ associations and non-affiliates. The contiguous borderlands of the three countries comprise a young population of ICBTs with low incomes who have spent relatively few years in cross-border trade. ICBTs who have been longer in the informal trade business have graduated into formal traders. ICBT activities highlight their contribution to regional integration, from the bottom up. Informal cross-border trade provides employment and livelihoods, placing ICBTs outside extremely poor populations living below USD$1.25 per day. ICBTs also have innovative informal ways of accessing credit based on personal interactions and shared experiences with suppliers of goods. Legally establishing the growth triangle creates an environment that ICBTs exploit in order to satisfy their economic needs, especially with government facilitation.

Read the full article here http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/hshZedXfiiF9ytTf5dzm/full

GovInn has a new constitution

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation has a new constitution that establishes its structures and relationships with the university and others, such as CIRAD. The Senate at the University of Pretoria approved this new constitution in September 2017. For those interested, you can read the document below.

New GovInn Constitution (2017)

‘Promoting equity in water access: the limits of fairness of a rural water programme in semi-arid Mozambique’, by Magalie Bourblanc, 23.08.2017

GovInn’s Senior Researcher Magalie Bourblanc published together with Raphaelle Ducrot the article ‘Promoting equity in water access: the limits of fairness of a rural water programme in semi-arid Mozambique‘ in the journal Natural Resources Forum.

Bridging the water infrastructure gap has become a major policy concern. In rural areas of Africa, access to water is as much constrained by territorial coverage as it is by the poor conditions of water points due to the difficulty in mobilizing communities for repairs. This paper examines the equity considerations of a rural water and sanitation programme in a district of Mozambique, and their impacts on the achievement of the programme’s objectives. Our analysis underlines the contradictions in the conceptualization of equity in the design, planning and implementation of the programme. Even an explicitly pro-poor strategy can fall short of delivering equity. Our findings stress the fact that overlooking local perception of equity can have a direct impact on the ability of a community to ensure the maintenance of their water points. They call for a careful definition of equity in the design of water programmes, as well as closer attention to this criterion as a precondition to achieving the long-term objective of the programme.

Read the full article here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1477-8947.12128/abstract