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Dr Bruno Losch on China Global Television Network

Bruno Losch, lead political economist at CIRAD and co-director of GovInn, based in Govinn’s Cape Town office at the University of the Western Cape, was host of Africa Live broadcasted by the China Global Television Network (CGTN).

In the video he discusses the recent NEPAD atlas on the emerging new rural Africa he coordinated last year and which was presented at the last AU Summit of the Heads of State in Addis Ababa. In this interview he insists on the importance of reshaping over-segmented public policies towards territorial approaches and local development.

 

You can watch the full video below.

The South African Land Observatory

Land governance and access to information

GovInn welcomes the opening of the South African Land Observatory (SALO), an initiative that promotes  evidence-based and inclusive decision-making over land resources in South Africa.

SALO offers people and organisations an accessible, open-data and open-source online hub for informed debate and interaction. The initiative makes user-friendly land-based information available to all stakeholders with the aim of creating an informed land community in South Africa, through facilitating access to data, information and networking. It is a one-stop help desk for the land community to debate the pressing questions of land ownership and land use in South Africa.

The platform, as it is seen now, is only a starting point. The website is participatory, populated through crowd-sourcing information for accuracy and updating by relevant stakeholder participants. We invite you to join the land community for debates, information exchange and networking for a participatory governance of land: Contribute here!

A pro-active process to introduce SALO to land stakeholders in South Africa and to engage with them in developing the land community will follow shortly.

SALO is supported by the Flemish Cooperation and hosted by the University of Pretoria, through the Postgraduate School of Agriculture and Rural Development, the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation, and the Department of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development. A small dedicated team of researchers, data and communication specialists created it and keep it constantly updated. Learn more about the South African Land Observatory 

Land Matrix rated among the top sources of data for international development by The Guardian

The Land Matrix, whose coordination team is based at GovInn, was rated a top source of data for international development data by the Guardian: The top 10 sources of data for international development research

Land Matrix is rubbing shoulders with the likes of the World Bank, IMF and UNDP data projects.

Guardian article

Book: ‘South Africa’s Agrarian Question’ by Hubert Cochet, Ward Anseeuw and Sandrine Fréguin-Gresh

South Africa’s Agrarian Question

South Africa’s Agrarian Question, by Hubert Cochet, Ward Anseeuw and Sandrine Fréguin-Gresh, to be published by HSRC Press this month:

Based on an in-depth analysis of several contrasting agricultural regions, this book aims to assess South Africa’s ongoing agrarian reform and the country’s agrarian dynamics.

The conclusion is without doubt: 20 years after the first democratic elections, the country’s land pattern remains almost unchanged, and primary agriculture and its broader value-chains are more concentrated than ever. Without fundamentally questioning the highly specialised, fossil energy and synthetic input dependent, oligopolistic entrepreneurial agricultural production model, which is presently structuring the sector and is guiding the reforms, a more equitable redistribution of resources and value-addition will by no means be possible.

The answers provided in this book will be of interest not only to all those interested in the South African experiment, but also to those who, in all regions, are questioning the mainstream agrifood regime and asking how it can be transformed – Olivier De Schutter

This book examines and contributes to the structural questions that underpin the current stagnation of South Africa’s agrarian reform. Presenting fresh approaches in analysing agrarian issues and tools to assess farming systems and agricultural development, this incisive study will be an important resource to policy makers, academics and those with an interest in agrarian reform.

More information on the book can be found here.

“The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity

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The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and SIWI invite you to a Rethinking Development Seminar

“The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity”

Presented by Rajendra Singh, The Water Man of India

Rajendra Singh is a well-known water conservationist. Also known as “Water Man of India”, he won the Stockholm Water Prize in 2015. Previously, he won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for community leadership in 2001 for his pioneering work in community-based efforts in water harvesting and water management. He has been instrumental in fighting slow bureaucracy and  mining lobbies and has helped villagers take charge of water management in their semi-arid areas through the use of ‘johad’, rainwater storage tanks, check dams and other time-tested as well as path-breaking techniques. He is one of the members of the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) under the Indian Ministry of the Environment. In 2008, The Guardian named him as one of the “50 people who could save the planet”.

Date: Thursday 3 March 2016
Time: 14:00-16:00 PM
Venue: GovInn Headquarters, Old College House, University of Pretoria Main Campus (Hatfield)

RSVP essential: Contact Neil Kasselman neil.kasselman@governanceinnovation.org by 29 February 2016.

Say goodbye to capitalism: Welcome to the Republic of Wellbeing, The Guardian 02.09.2015

New Zealand’s Whanganui River

In 2012, New Zealand’s Whanganui River became a legal entity with a legal voice.

GovInn Director Lorenzo Fioramonti and his colleagues in the Alliance for Sustainability and Prosperity have co-authored an article for The Guardian on their vision of a global governance transformation that will create governments committed to pursuing the Sustainable Development Goals of the post 2015 agenda.

 

Authored by: Lorenzo Fioramonti, Enrico Giovannini, Robert Constanza, Ida Kubiszewski, Kate Pickett, Kristin Vala Ragnarsdottir, Roberto de Vogli and Richard Wilkinson

Imagine a country genuinely committed to pursuing the sustainable development goals (SDGs), set to be agreed on by the international community later this month. It would place emphasis on human and ecosystem wellbeing as the ultimate objective of progress. This country – let’s call it the Republic of Wellbeing – and its business sector would need to embark on a profound transformation to achieve durable, long-term change.

Around the world today, companies and governments do precisely the opposite: they put more emphasis on short-term economic dynamics, or what Hillary Clinton criticised as “quarterly capitalism”. If we are serious about meeting the SDGs then this cannot continue.

Read the full article at The Guardian.

 

Governance of the Commons

 

Governance of the Commons

 

Common resources include land, water, energy, food and the host of ecosystem services that nature makes available to humankind every day, which are ultimately the precondition for development.

Can we imagine new and better ways to manage these resources sustainably and achieve more efficient and equitable results?

In 2009, Elinor Ostrom won the Nobel Prize in Economics for her work on the governance of the commons. Trained as a political scientist, she believed that privatization and commodification, on the one hand, or top-down regulation, on the other hand, were not the only ways in which human beings could govern their common resources.

She demonstrated that bottom-up systems of collective action, in which citizens build shared institutions and collective cooperative mechanisms, can also achieve governance results that are resilient, balanced and long-lasting.

In order to sustainably govern common resources, we, therefore, need innovative governance arrangements with new constellations of actors.

These arrangements may include small-scale farmers and local resource users but also other civil society actors, the private sector, as well as the government.

Only by incorporating networks of different actors and areas of society which span multiple levels of governance as well as administrative jurisdictions, will governance arrangements be created that are capable of coping with complex natural resource systems.

This research area includes our work in land and water governance, agriculture, food security and food sovereignty, as well as our research about environmental governance and more equitable investment models.

Current running projects: 


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Governance of the Commons

VIDEO: The financialisation of food and agriculture

GovInn Co-Director Ward Anseeuw, speaking at the BRICS Initiative for Critical Agrarian Studies Symposium describes the increasing financialisation of food and agriculture, and the impact this has on land and food availability.

 

Le Dessous des cartes

Land Matrix on ARTE (28.02.15)

On 28 February 2015 at 6.30pm (Pretoria time) the Franco-German TV station ARTE will broadcast the documentary,”Terres arables : un marché pas comme les autres” (Arable lands: a market like no other) featuring the data and the work of Land Matrix.

The documentary, avaiable in French and German, is the second part of an investigation on arable lands.
The first episode can be found here: “Competition pour les terres arables” (Competition for arable lands)

Land matrix in action: “Among the Senegalese Mother-Earths

The Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera features result from our LandMatrix  land monitoring project to describe the struggle of Senegalese women against land-grabbing multinationals. Read the full article here [Italian]