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African Borders, Human Mobility, Continental Integration and Development

This project interrogates mobility issues affecting ordinary people and economically active human resources within and across the borders of Africa’s disparate states. It also explores the dynamics of cooperation and the governance of trans-boundary natural resources. This is in a quest to examine the relationship between the spatial mobility of borders and development, as well as the migration regimes within which states that share contiguous borders in given geographic territories are embedded.

Project leaders: Dr Chris Nshimbi, Dr Inocent Moyo (University of Zululand).

 

Contacts

Chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org

“But where are the workers? How the youth entrepreneur model fails in Africa”, by Pierre Girard, December 2017

GovInn and CIRAD research fellow and PhD student Pierre Girard wrote an article for the University of the Witwatersrand’s Global Labour Column at the end of 2017. His article, entitled “But where are the workers? How the youth entrepreneur model fails in Africa” looks at the institutional structures in place to support youth employment in Africa, and where the continent is failing to ensure that entrepreneurs on the continent are properly supported.

The figures are now well known: 375 million young people will reach working age in Sub-Saharan Africa by 2030, and for many their livelihoods will depend mainly on the rural economy (Losch, 2016). Facing the massive generation of activity required by these demographic dynamics, entrepreneurship has become the leitmotiv of many donors’ and NGOs’ programmes and projects, as well as public policies. According to them, the multiplication of entrepreneurs can meet the employment challenge in the African countryside.

 

The article can be read in its entirety here. Or see below for the PDF version.

 

But where are the workers? by Pierre Girard

‘How boosting small businesses will help soften disruptive effect of machines’, by Lorenzo Fioramonti, 15.08.2017

GovInn’s Director Lorenzo Fioramonti published ‘How boosting small businesses will help soften disruptive effect of machines‘ in the Business Day.

In the award-winning book Rise of the Robots, futurist Martin Ford argues that automation will lead to widespread job losses, not only in the traditional blue-collar sectors, but also among white-collar workers. Conventional production chains and large industries have indeed invested massively in automation in the past few years. A study by McKinsey shows that many companies recovering from the 2008 financial crisis have replaced retrenched workers with machines, thus leading to “jobless” recoveries.

Read the full article here: https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/opinion/2017-08-15-how-boosting-small-businesses-will-help-soften-disruptive-effect-of-machines/

Public Lecture: “Economic Transformation in South Africa” with Mmusi Maimane

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) of the University of Pretoria, in partnership with Wits School of Governance is delighted to invite you to a public lecture on Economic Transformation in South Africa To be delivered by Mmusi Maimane, leader of the Democratic Alliance.

In the face of worsening economic conditions, calls for economic transformation in South Africa are getting louder. Yet the meaning and nature of this remain largely unclear. Although there seems to be consensus that transformation is a national imperative, a clear vision for the economic future of South Africa is lacking. Given the importance of political parties in shaping public debate and policy, the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) has decided to host a series of high-level public lectures at which the three leading political parties in South Africa will be given a platform to outline their economic visions for the country, focusing on transformation. This lecture series is inspired by the publication of Prof. Lorenzo Fioramonti’s latest book Wellbeing Economy: Success in a World Without Growth, which includes a section on how to change South Africa. After Mr Maimane’s main presentation, Prof. Fioramonti will provide a commentary based on the research conducted for his book.

Date: Thursday, 17 August 2017

Time: 18:30 – 20:30

Venue: Donald Gordon Auditorium, Wits School of Governance, 2 St David’s Place, Parktown

Seats are limited! RSVP essential! Click on this link: https://goo.gl/forms/qm1pvVCIDktZ1AgG2 by 14 August 2017.

Queries: neil.kasselman@governanceinnovation.org

 

INVITE – Public lecture by Mmusi Maimane on Economic Transformation (17.8.2017)

“Alternative currencies are the future: why it matters for development”, by Lorenzo Fioramonti 2.07.2017

The Conversation has published another article by GovInn Director Lorenzo Fioramonti, who writes about the contribution that alternative currencies can make to global development.

In the near future, we will have a variety of money with different qualities and different purposes. This will make economies more resilient against shocks and will support more equitable and sustainable development, by putting users in the driver seat and reinforcing local economic development.

You can read the entire article here.

Participants of the conference "ONE World No Hunger" hand over the "Berlin Charter" to Minister Muller.

The Berlin Charter on “Creating opportunities for the young generation in the rural world”

Bruno Losch, GovInn’s co-director, participated in the International Conference on The Future of the Rural World (Berlin, April 27-28) organized within the framework of the German G20 Presidency.

Bruno Losch was part of the International Advisory Committee in charge of drafting the Berlin Charter: “Creating opportunities for the young generation in the rural world“. The Charter was discussed through an open web based dialogue, amended, and then submitted to the Conference. Participants worked in six parallel thematic Charter Fora which provided final revisions. Bruno Losch was the advocate of the Charter Fora session on Entrepreneurship, jobs and skills. His testimony was shared along with the other advocates – including University of Pretoria’s Sheryl Hendricks – in a video presented to the audience.

The Charter was then approved by the Conference (the final version is here) and handed over to Dr. Gerd Müller, German Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development.

The Charter calls on all stakeholders – national governments, development partners and finance institutions, the private sector, civil society and youth  – for transformative change and to commit to significant, quantified and time-bound targets in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It particularly addresses the situation of people suffering hunger and undernutrition and the need for concerted political and humanitarian actions to immediately end the current food crises situations in Africa.

The Charter focuses on the critical importance of access to innovative education and training as well as information and communication technologies (ICTs) for youth and young entrepreneurs. It reminds the role of infrastructure and services in rural areas and the necessary change of perspective about the potential of rural areas in school, politics and the media. As highlighted by Losch, an important result of the Berlin Charter is that “it puts upfront the need to reinvest and invest in development strategies. We need to understand the processes underway in order to engage in better policy making”.

Bruno Losch also particpated in a parallel panel session titled “Decent Jobs for Youth in the Rural Economy” organized by FAO and ILO. More information can be found on the International Labour Organisation website.

For more information of the initiative, visit the website for the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development and the website of the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Food Security.

 

ILO Employment Research Brief

“+789 Million and Counting: the sub-Saharan African Equation”: ILO Employment Research Brief by Dr Bruno Losch

ILO (the International Labour Office) just released an Employment Research Brief titled: “+789 Million and Counting: the sub-Saharan African Equation” prepared with Bruno Losch, GovInn’s co-director.
This 8-pager is based on an ILO working paper published last November by Bruno Losch (Structural transformation to boost labour demand in sub-Saharan Africa: the role of agriculture, rural areas, and territorial development”). This brief focuses on SSA’s equation of providing quality jobs for a rapidly expanding and young labour force, in a context of limited economic diversification, critically challenged education systems, and under the constraints of increasing competition and climate change. 789 million is the expected increase of SSA’s labour force by 2050 and represents 62{4b05898ae60f9b5e2d93b69cb2027f6f0d06dfa7d8f8611bbe8472c2532adfa6} of the labour force growth worldwide.

The employment challenge in Africa is persistent and unique. It is not solely a challenge of unemployment, but one of providing quality jobs for a rapidly expanding, and markedly young, labour force. This research brief explores the opportunities that economic diversification offer to foster structural transformation in sub-Saharan Africa. It highlights three interconnected actions needed to achieve this goal: (i) supporting evidence-based multi-sectoral development strategies; (ii) supporting family farmers and diversification of rural incomes; and (iii) strengthening rural-urban linkages and promoting territorial policies.

 

To read the full document, see below: ILO_Research BRIEF Losch

Nepad Atlas

Dr Bruno Losch on China Global Television Network

Bruno Losch, lead political economist at CIRAD and co-director of GovInn, based in Govinn’s Cape Town office at the University of the Western Cape, was host of Africa Live broadcasted by the China Global Television Network (CGTN).

In the video he discusses the recent NEPAD atlas on the emerging new rural Africa he coordinated last year and which was presented at the last AU Summit of the Heads of State in Addis Ababa. In this interview he insists on the importance of reshaping over-segmented public policies towards territorial approaches and local development.

 

You can watch the full video below.

Nepad Atlas

Atlas – A New Emerging Rural World in Africa (2nd edition)

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement (CIRAD) are proud to announce the results of their scholarly collaboration with NEPAD on a new, revised and supplemented edition of the atlas A New Emerging Rural World – An Overview of Rural Change in Africa. The atlas was officially launched at the second Africa Rural Development Forum, organised by NEPAD in Yaoundé from 8 to 10 September 2016. The atlas reports on the dynamics at play within the rural world in Africa and on territorial restructuring within the continent.

This second, revised and supplemented edition of the atlas A New Emerging Rural World takes stock of rural restructuring in Africa, both North and sub-Saharan. It relates data on demographics, population, urbanization and resource use with spatial and economic dynamics, both on a continental scale and through several regional examples. It is a totally original tool, and is intended to fuel the debate on the main regional and continental development issues.

It is published jointly by CIRAD and NEPAD (New Partnership for Africa’s Development, a technical body of the African Union), with financial support from the Agence française de développement (AFD), and fits in with NEPAD’s new Rural Futures Programme, which is intended to support territorial dynamics and structural change for sustainable development of the continent.

The atlas comprises 24 spreads and 77 illustrations, and is the fruit of collaboration between 53 authors, 23 from CIRAD and 20 representatives of African institutions (including six GovInn researchers). It will be supplemented and updated regularly.

The atlas was widely praised by the participants in the 2nd Africa Rural Development Forum organized by NEPAD in Yaoundé, Cameroon, from 8 to 10 September 2016, and is due to be presented shortly to the European Union, the main donors in the rural sector and African Heads of State at the African Union Summit in Addis Ababa in late January 2017.
It is available on line, in English and French.

For more information on the Atlas as well as a look at the fourth infographic spread click here, or the NEPAD webpage here, to view the other corresponding spreads visit the CIRAD webpage here.

Brazil as a security and development provider in Africa, New policy paper by Frank Mattheis

Policy Paper - MattheisHow is the role of external actors in Africa changing and what consequences does this have for the European Union (EU) and its strategic position on the continent?

The research project ‘The EU, the US and the international strategic dimension of Sub-Saharan Africa: peace, security and development in the Horn of Africa’ seeks to address these questions in a series of policy papers. The first set of papers has just been published, covering the role of new and old actors such as Brazil, China, the Gulf States, Turkey and the US. In depth case studies on the Horn of Africa and an overarching policy report are to follow soon.

Senior research fellow Frank Mattheis contributed a policy paper on the role of Brazil as a security and development provider in Africa. It focuses on both the identity and the materiality of Brazil’s growing role on the continent, identifies the country’s current main challenges, and outlines opportunities for triangular cooperation with the EU.

The project is lead by the Istituto Affari Internazionali (IAI), the Foundation for European Progressive Studies (FEPS) and the National Democratic Institute (NDI), with the support of Italy’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation.