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Civil Society and World Regions

Civil society and world regions

 

Civil Society and World Regions
How Citizens Are Reshaping Regional Governance in Times of Crisis

Edited by Lorenzo Fioramonti

Contributions by Chukwudi David Anyanwu; Mercedes Botto; Alan Collins; Antonio Fiori; Andréas Godsäter; Okechukwu C. Iheduru; Sunhyuk Kim; Helen E.S. Nesadurai; Marco Pinfari; Jan Aart Scholte and Andy Storey

(Lexington Books, 2015)

Supranational regionalism and regional integration have for a long time been top-down processes, led by the few and imposed on the many. The role of citizens, especially those active in civil society, has been neglected by scholars, students, and commentators of regionalism. In reaction to the prevalence of these top-down models, a “new regionalism” approach has proliferated in the past few years. This book aims to further develop such a research agenda by providing an up-to-date overview of the contribution of civil society to world regionalism, from Europe to Africa, Asia, and the Americas. This is not only relevant as a research topic; it is also of critical importance from a political standpoint. As regions across the world experience prolonged governance crises, it becomes paramount to understand the extent to which these new regional formations actually reflect the interests and needs of their people. While old regionalism was accepted as a de facto elite-driven byproduct of both the Cold War and neoliberal globalization, the twenty-first-century regionalism—if it is to survive—will need to refocus its objectives through new forms of participation and inclusion. Regions without citizens are unlikely to stand the test of time, especially in times of crises.

Contexualising the tool development process through a knowledge brokering approach: The case of climate change adaptation and agriculture

Camilla Adelle has published an article in Environmental Science and Policy that tests various knowledge brokerage approaches in a ‘real life’ policy context.

Abstract: This article applies a ‘knowledge brokering’ approach to contextualise the development of an integrated computer modelling tool into the real world policy context of adaptation of agriculture to climate change at the EU level. In particular, the article tests a number of knowledge brokering strategies described and theorised in the literature, but seldom empirically tested. The article finds that while the policy context can be used to identify a theoretically informed knowledge brokering strategy, in practice a strategy’s ‘success’ is more informed by practical considerations, such as whether the tool development process is knowledge or demand driven. In addition, in practice the knowledge brokering process is found to be dynamic and messy, which is not always apparent in the literature. The article goes on to question the perception that there is always a need (or a desire) to bridge the gap between researchers and policy makers in the tool development process. Rather than a problem of design and communication, the science policy interface may be characterised more by a high level of competition between researchers and research organisations to have their tool legitimised by its use in the policy making process.

Read the full article in Environmental Science and Policy

Policy Coherence for Development in the European Union: Do New Procedures Unblock or Simply Reproduce Old Disagreements?

Camilla Adelle has written an article with Andrew Jordan of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Research on how the EU is struggling to coordinate its policies so that they do not undermine its own international development objectives.

Title: Policy Coherence for Development in the European Union: Do New Procedures Unblock or Simply Reproduce Old Disagreements?

 

Abstract: Policy coherence for development (PCD) — the integration of the needs of developing countries into all policy areas — is now an EU policy goal. This article focuses on how far this ambitious goal has been addressed in a policy procedure — impact assessment (IA) — established to support such cross-cutting goals. Drawing on an analysis of the 2006 and 2013 reforms of the EU’s sugar policy, it finds that while IA offered a new venue in which to debate PCD, in practice it reproduced the same disagreements that previously frustrated agricultural reform. The article shows how IA was shaped during its implementation, so instead of functioning as a bureau- cratic procedure to pursue policy coherence, it simply buttressed the power of domi- nant groups. Advocates of policy coherence in general and PCD in particular should therefore be mindful that the toolbox of implementing instruments in the EU may be more limited than sometimes assumed.

Read the full paper in the Journal of European Integration

Workshop on the EU’s External Environmental Policy

A three-day workshop on the EU’s external environmental policy was held at the University of Pretoria on 2-4 June as part of the GovInn Week 2015.

The EU has long been reported to be a global environmental leader and is party to the major international environmental treaties. However, apart from multi-lateral negotiations, the EU seeks to extend it environmental norms, rules and polices beyond its legal jurisdiction through a surprisingly large array of instruments, including: bilateral trade agreements, strategic partnerships, transnational policy networks, and development cooperation.

This workshop brought together a small group of top international scholars from around the world to explore how, where and to what effect the EU is embarking on new forms of external environmental governance.

 

 

The workshop programme is below:

Programme: The External Dimension of the European Union’s Environmental policy
2-4 June 2015, Graduate Centre,University of Pretoria, South Africa
Monday 1 June Arrival of international participants
Tuesday 2 June: Day One
08:30 – 09.00  Coffee and registration
Session 1
09:00 – 10:45 Opening remarks: Camilla Adelle, GovInn, University of Pretoria (South Africa)
“The external dimension of EU climate and energy policy”
John Vogler, Keele University (UK)
“The EU in international environmental negotiations” Tom Delreux, Institut de Sciences Politiques Louvain (UC Louvain)Read the policy brief adapted from Professor Delreux’s conference paper here.
Chair: Camilla Adelle, GovInn, University of Pretoria (South Africa)
10.45 – 11.15                 Coffee break
Session 2
11.15 – 13.00 The EU’s external governance tool box
“The European External Action Service”Diarmuid Torney, Dublin City University (Ireland) Read the policy brief adapter from Dr Torney’s conference paper here.
“EU climate diplomacy and the challenge of norm entrepreneurship”
Mai’a Davis Cross, Northeastern University (US)
Chair:  Navraj Singh Ghaleigh, University of Edinburgh (UK)
13.00 – 14.00                  Lunch
Session 3
14.00 – 15.45 The EU’s external governance tool box
“Can environmental standards in trade agreements be effective instruments of EU external environmental governance?” Evgeny Postnikov, University of Glasgow (UK) Read the policy brief adapted by Dr Postnikov’s from his conference paper here.
“Market-based instruments to support climate change objectives: Encouraging action on carbon taxes and emissions trading beyond Europe”, Sirini Withana, Konar Mutafoglu and Patrick ten Brink, Institute for European Environmental Policy (Belgium and UK)
“The Salience of EU Climate Law: Inspiration, Diplomacy by Law and ‘Learning by Doing’ in East Asia” Navraj Singh Ghaleigh, University of Edinburgh (UK)
Chair:  Mai’a Davis Cross, Northeastern University, US
15.45 – 16.30                Break
16.30 – 18.30 GovInn Week Keynote lecture: UP Conference Centre

“Poverty with added vitamins? Competing ways to govern the world food system”
Raj Patel, New York Times bestselling author of Stuffed and Starved and The Value of Nothing. Books available for sale.


18.30                             Reception: UP Conference Centre  
                                     (buses back to guest house)

 

08:30 – 09.00                  Coffee
Session 1
9.00 – 10.45 Country perspectives
“Making sense of the EU’s external climate change governance towards its southern neighbours”
Angelos Katsaris, College of Europe (Poland)“Integrating public participation into China’s environmental governance: The EU’s external influence”
Wen Xiang, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)
Chair: Tom Delreux, Institut de Sciences Politiques Louvain (UC Louvain)
10.45 – 11.15     Coffee Break
Session 2
11.15 – 13.00 Country perspectives
“The EU’s role in natural resource use in Africa” Oladiran Bello, South African Institute of International Affairs (South Africa)
“Contributions of the EU to the Construction of Latin American Environmental Governance” Roberto Dominguez, Suffolk University, Boston (USA)Read the policy brief adapted from Professor Dominguez’s conference paper here.
Chair: Sarah Delputte, University of Ghent (Belgium)
13.00 – 14.00                  Lunch
Session 3
14.00 – 15.45 Future Challenges
“The limits of leadership in a cold economic climate: Whither the EU as an environmental normative power?” Charlotte Burns and Paul Tobin, University of York (UK)
“Closing discussion: next steps”
Chair: John Vogler, Keele University (UK)
15.45-16.30                              Break
16.30 – 18.30 GovInn Keynote lecture: UP Conference Centre

“Within or beyond capitalism? Four scenarios for the emerging collaborative economy”

Michel Bauwens, founder of the Peer-To-Peer Foundation and author of Network Society and Future Scenarios for a Collaborative Economy.
Books available for sale.


18.30 Reception

Workshop on EU-Africa Relations

A one-day workshop reflecting on the state of EU-Africa relations will be held in early June at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. This will be the inaugural event of ESA-SSA.

Taking place in Africa, the workshop will capitalize on its geographic position to highlight views from the continent about this long-standing and sometimes problematic relationship. EU-Africa relations are moving beyond that of donor and client to reflect changing circumstances in Africa and Europe.

This workshop will highlight some of these changes, including the roles of African agency and innovation in changing the terms of the relationship. Focus will also be placed on multilateral issues that are of priority to Africans vis a vis the EU, such as migration, agriculture and protectionism, and peace and security cooperation.

Are cooperatives better suited to deal with crises: perspectives from Europe and South America

Claudia Bajo Policy Brief 8

Are cooperatives better suited to deal with crises: perspectives from Europe and South America

(GovInn, June 2014)

Author: Claudia Sanchez Bajo

There has been little research on cooperatives within regionalism and in particular, how regionalism works in an effort to compare policy making between two regional integration processes. This work will first analyse the role of cooperatives in regionalism in terms of policy, including standards, enterprise statutes and statistics, with particular Cooperativesregard to the role of the networks in the initiatives and their participation in regional integration policy making. The building of networks is one of the expected spillovers from regionalism. However, in the concept of ‘new regionalism’, the role of business actors is enhanced through networks promoting both entrepreneurial action as well as strategic influence on the development path of the countries involved.

For more info see: http://governanceinnovation.org/wordpress/353/govinnpolicybrief82014-compressed/