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University of Amsterdam

Call for Applications: Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Political Economy at the University of Amsterdam

Professor Daniel Mügge

Professor Daniel Mügge, head of the research project ‘The Political Economy of Macroeconomic Measurement’

The Department of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam invites applications for a 18 month postdoctoral research fellowship. The position is part of the research project ‘The Political Economy of Macroeconomic Measurement’, led by prof. Daniel Mügge and funded by the European Research Council (ERC). The Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences (FMG) of the University of Amsterdam (UvA) is the largest educational and research institution in the social sciences in the Netherlands, and one of the highest-ranked such institutions in Europe.

Systematic knowledge on the politics of macroeconomic measurement is thin for OECD members already. But it is almost non-existent for other countries. To address this gap, this postdoc project focuses on one non-OECD economy: South Africa. It has become an important player on the global economic stage over the past two decades, and it has been drawn into the web of global economic governance. That has entailed an increasing embrace of macroeconomic measurement practices such as the System of National Accounts, which had been devised by and for rich, developed countries. At the same time, South Africa comes to global statistical practices from a very specific vantage point, given both its legacy of apartheid and a highly idiosyncratic economic structure.

 

Closing date for application is 26 April 2017.

More information about this call can be found here.

Population growth and regional development: African Economic Outlook 2015, coordinated by CIRAD

rapport-2015-perspectives-economiques-en-afrique_lightboxWith a population set to more than double by 2050 to over two billion inhabitants, half of whom will be under 25, Africa is facing unprecedented structural challenges. Population growth is an opportunity for economic growth, but it will undoubtedly upset regional equilibria. Those upsets will mean making in-depth changes to the approaches taken as regards development policy. This is what emerges from the 2015 edition of the African Economic Outlook, in which several CIRAD researchers participated, which was published recently.

The report contains thematic chapters whose topic varies each year. It is regional development that is the topic for the 2015 edition, of which CIRAD was scientific coordinator.

According to the Report, the African continent is predicted to receive a “demographic dividend” and to benefit for a few decades from a greater number of workers than of unemployed. This situation will free up potential to save, invest and boost incomes.

However, the report also contains a warning: it will be necessary to change the perspective of development policies, or else this “demographic dividend” will be lost and there will be a significant risk of a hitherto unseen rise in poverty and risks of conflict. This gift of more inhabitants and workers is an asset for the continent, on one condition: that the subsequent growth is inclusive and creates jobs.

Read the full presentation on CIRAD’s website

 Access the full report here