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SEMINAR : ‘South Sudan’s Revitalised Peace Agreement: Past, Present and Future Challenges to Peace’, 27 September 2018, 10:20-13:00.

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation and Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria and the Institute of African Renaissance Studies, UNISA invite you to a seminar entitled;

SOUTH SUDAN’S REVITALISED PEACE AGREEMENT:

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE CHALLENGES TO PEACE 

Five years since the outbreak of the current conflict, the ruling Sudanese People Liberation Movement- in Government (SPLM-IG), and the SPLM-in-Opposition (IO) have yet again entered into an agreement. This seminar aims to provide an understanding of why crucial peace negotiations and efforts have been failing in South Sudan. Through a review of prior events, the many peace negotiations and deep-seated issues, the seminar will map out the complex journey that this country has travelled.

Presented by:

Prof. Martin Rupiya (IARS-UNISA): Styles on Mediation and Foreign Policy convergence in South Sudan, Uganda and Sudan

Dr. Nelson Alusala (GovInn-UP): Peace Agreements Image removed by sender. page1image1815488Process of Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) and Security Sector Reform interventions in South Sudan

Ms. Emmaculate Asige Liaga (Dep of PolSci-UP): Characteristics of societal- traditional peace and conflict Bottom-Up peace and peacebuilding strategies to meet the dynamic context of South Sudan

Date: 27th September 2018

Time: 10:30-13:00

Venue: Old College House, University of Pretoria

RSVP https://goo.gl/forms/ v1bvjSFvlkucZdQ33 by 26 September

Kindly address any queries to Ms. Emmaculate Liaga emmaliaga@yahoo.com or Mr. Alfred Matjila matjila@unisa.ac.za

Borders, War, Peace and Regional Integration Schemes in Africa

The project investigates how the porosity of African borders might exacerbate war and conflict and the way in which this impacts on regional integration on one hand, and the extent to which regional and continental integration could contribute towards cooperation, peace and well-being in Africa on the other hand. The project goes beyond the analysis, description and/or outlining of the causes of conflict in Africa. It engages in a serious consideration of initiatives and innovations that can be put in place or are already being employed on the ground, within the current regional and continental integration debates and practice.

Project leaders: Dr Inocent Moyo (University of Zululand), Dr Chris Nshimbi.

 

Contacts

Chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org

Ruth Murambadoro at HagueTalks, 13.06.2017

GovInn’s Research Fellow Ruth Murambadoro presented at the HagueTalks on peace and justice.

HagueTalks  is a platform that encourages critical debates about peace and justice. It is a breeding ground where creative minds, peace innovators and game changers gather to share ideas on how to advance peace and justice in various communities. On the 13th of June 2017 our Emerging Scholar Ms Ruth Murambadoro graced the stage at HagueTalks and shared her views on the topic of the day, How to get inclusive justice?. Ms Murambadoro believes that inclusive justice begins when we are able to understand that a human being is a spirit being that exists in a cosmological society comprising of the ‘living-living’, the ‘living-dead’ and the ‘living unborn’. She shared that when an injustice occurs it does not only hurt the physical body because the pain goes deep inside and destroys the spirit being. If one wants to make amends or retain the balance where there has been an imbalance, there is need to ensure that they do not only attend to the physical wounds but address the spirit because a human being is a living spirit. Therefore as a living spirit, justice is an all-encompassing process where you make sure you attend to the psychosocial and the spiritual needs of the spirit being. Justice is not a one-size-fits-all, it has to be tailor made to ensure that it meets the needs of the people that are affected by conflict. Ms Murambadoro argued that we do not have to do justice for the state or international bodies because it is the individual that is affected. Hence, before we impose our solutions to a conflict situation, we ought to give more time to understanding the depth of the wound carried by the affected parties in order to provide justice that is deep enough to unpluck the root of the wound.

‘Rwanda & South Africa: a long road from truth to reconciliation’ by Cori Wielenga, The Conversation, 06.04.2017

GovInn’s Senior Researcher Cori Wielenga published the article ‘Rwanda & South Africa: a long road from truth to reconciliation‘ in The Conversation.

Rwanda took a different path. It focused on establishing individual perpetrators’ accountability for genocide crimes. Many were unsettled by this rigorous quest. There were calls for Rwanda to mimic South Africa and take the route of amnesty in exchange for truth. That would have assumed the wounds of the violent massacre of possibly a million people in three months were identical to the wounds of apartheid. I don’t want to suggest for a moment that wounds left by Rwanda’s genocide were harder to heal than those left by apartheid. But it’s critical to understand that they left behind different kinds of devastations.

Read the full article here: https://theconversation.com/rwanda-and-south-africa-a-long-road-from-truth-to-reconciliation-75628

 

First day of Legacy of Armed Conflicts Workshop: Photos

On 28 July 2016, the Legacy of Armed Conflicts: Sub-Saharan and Comparative Perspectives workshop commenced with the keynote address by Professor Timothy Sisk on trends, causes and consequences of conflict in the 21st Century. Professor Sisk commented on the role of local conflict in the international sphere and the need for increased focus on social cohesion.

After lunch, the participants split into two panels to further discuss the approaches, the trends and current studies in conflicts on the African continent.

See photo’s of the days event below.

ZOPACAS at 30: Its formation, potential and limitations

This research project seeks to stimulate the broadening of the scientific-academic debate over the current and potential configuration of the Zone of Peace and Cooperation of the South Atlantic (ZOPACAS), both within the context of Brazilian interests and in the framework of increasing international focus over South Atlantic dynamics. With over 30 years of existence, ZOPACAS accounts today for a singular case of a multilateral platform, transversal to multiple global developments in the last few decades. Its institutional resilience associated to a characteristically legal singularity in terms of other multilateral experiences as well as an express desire to widen its thematic range of action, make this forum a noticeable case study. That relevance, in turn, only increases if we also consider the underlined notion of a supposedly common perception of an oceanic region, as an aggregating element of South American and African countries, as well as its passive contribution – never really challenged or tested – to regional security and stability.

ZOPACAS flag
On the other hand, the pre-salt discoveries, the resurgence of the Brazilian defense industry, the bet on South-South relations and the political-commercial investments in Africa also incited Brazil to concern itself once again with developments in the South Atlantic. It is therefore understandable why the progressive reinforcement of ZOPACAS is considered relevant to Brazil’s own defense, as mentioned by the Defense White Book, and inter-relates easily with the national foreign policy domain.
In this context, while combining an historical balance (1986-2016) with a structural evaluation of the current limits, capacities and eventual potentialities of ZOPACAS, this project thus seeks to provide a complete and deepened perspective of a regional mechanism, frequently neglected by academic literature and never fully researched in its totality. Moreover, it seeks to answer the increasing demand, both internal and external, for detailed information over ZOPACAS and provide greater substance to the national decision-making process regarding Brazil’s active participation in such a multilateral body.

GovInn researcher: Frank Mattheis

Partner institutions: University of Brasilia (Brazil), Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), University of Lisbon (Portugal), University of Rosario (Argentina)

Funding institutions: Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) and the Brazilian Defence Ministry’s Pandiá Calógeras Institute

Funding period: January 2015 to December 2016