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The New Politics of Regionalism

Book Cover

Book Cover: The New Politics of Regionalism

On 14 December, GovInn senior researcher Frank Mattheis will participate in the launch of the book “The New Politics of Regionalisms” at the Centre for Area Studies at the University of Leipzig (Germany). He co-edited book, which was published in October 2016 by Routledge, with Ulf Engel, Heidrun Zinecker, Antje Dietze and Thomas Plötze, and contributed to several chapters in the volume. Jon Schubert, postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Leipzig, will act as discussant for the evening.

Since the end of the Cold War, different forms of territorialization have emerged and we are confronted with an increasing number and variety of actors that are establishing regional projects. How can the study of the emergence and transformation of regionalisms and of different forms of territorialization aid in understanding the dynamics of this post-Cold War world order? This edited volume brings together innovative contributions to the study of this new complexity. It focuses on the role of regional actors, and the making and interplay of regionalisms in the processes of reshaping social spaces within an evolving global order. Analysing these new regionalisms from the perspective of the Global South, the contributions in the volume highlight the struggles that take place between a variety of actors, departing from state-centred perspectives and focusing on the transformations and constructions of regionalisms across varying spatial dimensions.

Organized into three sections, the volume attempts to identify the specific conditions and junctures of different forms of region-making in their external (global) and internal (local /national) dimensions. The volume also places special emphasis on interactions, spatial entanglements and comparisons between regionalisms in different parts of the world. By expanding beyond the perspective of North-South transfers, this book seeks to better understand the dynamics and diversity of interregional interactions. The first section looks at the purposes and logics behind regionalisms beyond their declared objectives, followed by a section on the dynamic relations between regionalisms, going beyond a European Union perspective. The final part looks at the place actors have other than states in the making of regionalisms. Throughout the volume, cases and empirical studies from Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa as well as Southeast Asia and the Southwest Pacific support these sections and challenge established notions of regionalism by going beyond a Eurocentric approach.

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THE ATLANTIC WEBINAR: REGIONALISMS ACROSS THE ATLANTIC with Frank Mattheis

ATLANTIC FUTURE is pleased to invite you to a webinar “Regionalisms across the Atlantic: divergences and convergences”, to be conducted by Frank Mattheis, Senior Researcher at the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation at the University of Pretoria, and Andrés Malamud, Research Fellow at the Institute of Social Sciences (ICS) of the University of Lisbon, as discussant.

Read the original post on ATLANTIC FUTURE

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The prevalence of national and global interactions notwithstanding, regions have established themselves as a crucial space in international relations.  In addition, regions are also emerging as actors in their own right. Projects to build regions are particularly active in the four Atlantic regions (Latin America, Africa, Europe and North America) and some of them even transcend the continental divisions. This Atlantic Future webinar will investigate the logics of regional projects, the driving actors and the capacities of regional organisations. The participants will assess the different models and trajectories of regionalism on the four shores of the Atlantic space. Elizabeth Tedsen at Ecologic Institute will moderate the webinar and Laia Tarragona at CIDOB will present the Atlantic Future project.

Time: 16:00 CET

The webinar has been scheduled as a Google Hangout on Air. To view it, follow the link https://plus.google.com/events/cvcikkbrbi7nh3besmuciv8ieng

Ask questions: You can post questions prior or during the event. However, note that you need to have a Google+ profile or a Gmail address. Questions will appear on the right side of the screen, which is where you can submit your questions as well. Simply click “Ask a new question!” and the moderator will see it.

Requirements: You only need high speed Internet connection (please note that Explorer does not always work. This is why we advise you to use Google Chrome).

For more information, please send an e-mail to: ltarragona@cidob.org

Dr Frank Mattheis is Senior Researcher at the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) at the University of Pretoria. He joined GovInn in 2014 and is currently carrying out his research on comparative regionalism, interregionalism and maritime security through a postdoc fellowship of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). Prior to GovInn, Frank Mattheis was senior research fellow at the Centre for Area Studies of the University of Leipzig from 2011 to 2014. He is trained in Global Studies with a M.A. from the Universities of Leipzig and Vienna and a Dr. phil. from the University of Leipzig.

Dr Andrés Malamud is Research Fellow at the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisboa and Associate Researcher at IPRI. His work has been published in many internationally renowned academic journals. He served four year in the executive committee of the Latin American Political Science Association.

 

ZOPACAS at 30: Its formation, potential and limitations

This research project seeks to stimulate the broadening of the scientific-academic debate over the current and potential configuration of the Zone of Peace and Cooperation of the South Atlantic (ZOPACAS), both within the context of Brazilian interests and in the framework of increasing international focus over South Atlantic dynamics. With over 30 years of existence, ZOPACAS accounts today for a singular case of a multilateral platform, transversal to multiple global developments in the last few decades. Its institutional resilience associated to a characteristically legal singularity in terms of other multilateral experiences as well as an express desire to widen its thematic range of action, make this forum a noticeable case study. That relevance, in turn, only increases if we also consider the underlined notion of a supposedly common perception of an oceanic region, as an aggregating element of South American and African countries, as well as its passive contribution – never really challenged or tested – to regional security and stability.

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On the other hand, the pre-salt discoveries, the resurgence of the Brazilian defense industry, the bet on South-South relations and the political-commercial investments in Africa also incited Brazil to concern itself once again with developments in the South Atlantic. It is therefore understandable why the progressive reinforcement of ZOPACAS is considered relevant to Brazil’s own defense, as mentioned by the Defense White Book, and inter-relates easily with the national foreign policy domain.
In this context, while combining an historical balance (1986-2016) with a structural evaluation of the current limits, capacities and eventual potentialities of ZOPACAS, this project thus seeks to provide a complete and deepened perspective of a regional mechanism, frequently neglected by academic literature and never fully researched in its totality. Moreover, it seeks to answer the increasing demand, both internal and external, for detailed information over ZOPACAS and provide greater substance to the national decision-making process regarding Brazil’s active participation in such a multilateral body.

GovInn researcher: Frank Mattheis

Partner institutions: University of Brasilia (Brazil), Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), University of Lisbon (Portugal), University of Rosario (Argentina)

Funding institutions: Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) and the Brazilian Defence Ministry’s Pandiá Calógeras Institute

Funding period: January 2015 to December 2016