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Public Lecture: “Donald Trump: Aggravator or Catalyzer of the EU crises?”

The Center for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and Department of Political Sciences invite you to our public lecture, “Donald Trump: Aggravator or Catalyzer of the EU crises?” with guest speaker Professor Wolfgang Seibel from the University of Konstanz (Germany). Professor Seibel is a Professor of Political and Administrative Sciences at the University of Konstanz, Germany, and an Adjunct Professor of Public Administration at the Hertie School of Governance, Berlin. He held guest professorships at the University of California at Berkeley, Stanford University and the Central European University, Budapest. He was twice a temporary member of the Institute of Advanced Study, Princeton, and a Fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. In 2009, he was elected member of the Heidelberg Academy of Science. His latest publications include “Arduous Learning or New Uncertainties? The Emergence of German Diplomacy in the Ukrainian Crisis” (Global Policy, 2015), “Persecution and Rescue. The Politics of the ‘Final Solution’ in France, 1940–‐1944” (University of Michigan Press, 2016).

Date: 15 February 2017
Time: 16:00‒18:00
Venue: GovInn Headquarters, Old College House (Building 24 on campus map), University of Pretoria Main Campus (Hatfield), please use entrance on University Road.
RSVP: 14 February by following this link: https://goo.gl/forms/rhfD2049F70G0dKM2
Enquiries: info@governanceinnovation.org

Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) Old College House
University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20
Hatfield – 0028 Pretoria

South Africa

www.governanceinnovation.org

“Regional Migration Governance in the African Continent: Current state of affairs and the way forward” 10.11.2016

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) has just released its latest research report on the current state of affairs and the way forward on regional migration governance on the African continent. The report is released in collaboration with The Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) and was made possible with generous funding from Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit gGmbH (GIZ), Germany Globalvorhaben Flüchtlinge on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation (Bundesministerium für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung (BMZ).

Authored by GovInn Director Lorenzo Fioramonti and Deputy-Director Chris Nshimbi under the title of “Regional Migration Governance in the African Continent: Current state of affairs and the way forward” the report gives an overview on migration legislation as well as policy initiatives and their implementation in West, East and Southern Africa. Further, it points to future scenarios of regional migration in Africa and gives political recommendations to external actors. The study builds on the discussions of this year’s Potsdam Spring Dialogues on the topic of “Pathways Towards Coordinated African Migration Governance. The African Regional Organisations’ Role”. The Study has been submitted by the UNESCO-UNU Chair in Regional Integration, Migration and Free Movement of People of the University of Pretoria. The full Report can be viewed here.

 

Call for papers ‘Transnational conflicts in Africa: Migration, mobility and peace’

Geographies for Peace

2017 IGU-UGI Thematic Conference

23-25 April 2017

La Paz, Bolivia

Transnational conflicts in Africa: Migration, mobility and peace

While wars and conflicts in Africa generally occur within the territorial boundaries of affected states, they tend to spill over across borders into proximate and neighboring countries. Most victims of such wars and conflict also share historical and ethnic backgrounds with kith and kin in neighboring countries and tend to flee, for refuge and asylum, to the peaceful proximate neighbors. Cases have been recorded in which governments in the conflict ridden states openly accused their neighbors of fueling the conflict in the accuser’s territory. Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda and Uganda in the Great Lakes Region are good contemporary cases in point. This session will explore the dynamics of the transnational nature of conflicts in Africa and examine the relationship between conflict and the spatial mobilities of borders, as well as the migration regimes within which states that share contiguous borders in given geographic territories are embedded. In this CFP, we invite papers that interrogate these themes as well as topics including, but not limited to:

How do the contiguous border regimes in Africa precipitate the fueling of transnational conflict?

What patterns do such conflicts follow?

Who are the victims and the perpetrators? Could transnational dynamics of conflict provide the basis for negotiating lasting peace or, on the contrary, do they fuel conflict?

Are there any linkages between, among others, coloniality of borders, conflict, and sociocultural and ethnic relations?

What role could the porosity of borders in Africa play in sustaining and perpetuating conflict?

Could the porosity of African borders and migration patterns also provide a foundation for building peace?

Contact:

Dr. Christopher Changwe Nshimbi (University of Pretoria, South Africa)

csnzed@gmail.com

Dr. Inocent Moyo (University of Zululand, South Africa)

minnoxa@yahoo.com

An abstract of no more than 250 words in English or Spanish should be sent to csnzed@gmail.com and minnoxa@yahoo.com and geographiesforpeace@gmail.com on or before 1 December 2016.

For more information on the conference visit the website here.

Call for papers ‘The African Union and African Economic Community: Territorial and economic arrangements for peace in Africa’

Geographies for Peace

2017 IGU-UGI Thematic Conference

23-25 April 2017

La Paz, Bolivia

The African Union and African Economic Community: Territorial and economic arrangements for peace in Africa

Concerned with the plight of especially women and children as major victims of wars, civil conflicts, human rights violations, humanitarian disasters, gender-based violence and violent conflicts, and genocide, the African Union (AU) has committed to speeding-up actions that will “silence the guns by 2020” in its Agenda 2063, in order to make peace a reality for all people in Africa. This resonates with sustainable development goals (SDGs) 5 and 16 to achieve gender equality and promote peace, justice and strong institutions for development. These attempts conform with the AU’s plans to establish a continental free trade area (CFTA) in 2017. The CFTA should lead to the establishment of the African Economic Community (AEC) in 2028, according to the Abuja Treaty for the Establishment of the AEC. Besides low intra-regional trade, persistent war and conflict are commonly cited as a major reason and evidence of the failure of regional integration, in Africa at least. In this regard, a connection exists between conflict on the one hand and regional integration and peace on the other, based on the understanding that peace is essential to unimpeded trade, development and inter-state cooperation. Against this background and in this CFP, we invite papers that interrogate these themes as well as topics including, but not limited to:

How does obsessive regard for territorial sovereignty impact on the readiness and the extent to which the supranational AU, the AU Commission (AUC) and respective member states can and intervene in domestic conflicts occurring in African states?

Does the absence of war guarantee a peace that ensures distribution, location and spatial organization of economic activities leading to successful regional integration?

Practically, how can ambitions to establish a single geo- political and economic space from Africa’s tapestry of states, economies, cultures and customs by the AU be translated into a mosaic of grassroots, meso- and macro- level actors committed to peaceful coexistence?

Contact:

Dr. Christopher Changwe Nshimbi (University of Pretoria, South Africa)

csnzed@gmail.com

Dr. Inocent Moyo (University of Zululand, South Africa)

minnoxa@yahoo.com

An abstract of no more than 250 words in English or Spanish should be sent to csnzed@gmail.com and minnoxa@yahoo.com and geographiesforpeace@gmail.com on or before 1 December 2016.

For more information on the conference visit the website here.

Call for applicants to the GEM-STONES PhD fellowships 2016

The European Joint Doctorate on Globalisation, Europe and Multilateralism- Sophistication of the Transnational Order, Networks, and European Strategies (GEM-STONES) is awarding up to 15 full-time 3-year PhD Fellowships dealing with the EU’s capacity to provide purposeful complex regime management on a global scale. In regional studies an open call is extended to graduates for a PhD position in International Relations and Comparative Regionalism in three programs, “Comparing Responsibility to Protect Diffusion in Regional Organisations: The EU, ECOWAS, UNASUR and the ASEAN Regional Forum”, “Comparing Overlapping Regional Security Institutions and the role of the European Union’s External Action ” and “Comparing Competing forms of Regionalism and their Impact on Regionalism”.

The deadline for applications is the 15th September 2016. Follow the links for further information regarding the fellowships available as well as application procedures and contact information. For more information on the other GEM-STONES fellowships on offer see their web page here.

 

 

GovInn deputy director Chris Nshimbi delivers keynote address at 2016 Potsdam Spring Dialogues

 

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GovInn Deputy Director, Chris Nshimbi, participated in this year’s Potsdam Spring Dialogues in Germany held on 7-8 April 2016 under the theme “Pathways towards Coordinated African Migration Governance: The African Regional Organisations’ Role.” Chris gave a Keynote Address on Africa’s position and policies on migration. For more information of the conference, see the conference report…

 

pfg-2016_conference-report_en_2016-05-02_web

Call for applications: Fully-funded full-time collaborative PhD in ‘Transdisciplinary Approaches to Wildlife Security’

GovInn-Logo-high-resolution-Man

 

The Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) at the University of Pretoria are accepting applications for a fully-funded, full-time PhD studentship starting in April 2016. GovInn, the University of Pretoria and CSIR have a national and worldwide reputation for excellence in research, innovation and the application of innovative solutions to complex problems.

  • Qualification type: PhD
    Location: Pretoria, working at the CSIR
  • Eligible nationality: South African
  • Funding amount: ZAR220, 000, tax free
  • Hours: Full time
  • Duration: 2 years
  • Applications:  Open until position is filled

This studentship is part of a collaborative transdisciplinary research project between CSIR and GovInn on alternative approaches to the governance of resources in South Africa and Southern Africa. Research under this particular project simultaneously focuses on two domains: 1) wildlife crime (with a focus on rhino poaching) as a security challenge and 2) transdisciplinary science for addressing complex international/regional security problems. The research, which is the first- ever attempt to use such an approach on such a scale, will make use of innovative, transdisciplinary methods. It will involve a variety of local, national and international stakeholders in driving socioeconomic policy and will make practical recommendations for policy innovation and change in South Africa and its region.

The studentship offers:

  • R220,000 tax free
  • Full Time
  • The opportunity to be part of a transdisciplinary team working on ground-breaking research on a major national/regional project.
  • The opportunity to work and collaborate with established researchers at the University of Pretoria and CSIR.Specifically, the successful candidate will be requested to focus on one of these topics in dealing with wildlife crime:
  1. regional and international cooperation;
  2. national law enforcement;
  3. the role of local communities and societal stakeholders.

A number of perspectives can be adopted to address the complexity of wildlife crime. These include:

  • Participatory governance;
  • Conservation;
  • International cooperation;
  • Transnational organised crime;
  • Law enforcement; and
  • Sustainable livelihoods.The successful candidate will be expected to fulfil class and academic requirements at the University of Pretoria, conduct research, as well as assist with administrative and other tasks. He/She will also be responsible for identifying research questions and choosing methodologies aligned to the transdisciplinary research topic.The studentship will be awarded at the PhD level. The requirements are:
  1. A relevant Master’s degree in the social sciences.
  2. At least two years of work experience.
  3. Excellent writing and communication skills.
  4. Good command of English and knowledge of at least one local language.
  5. Applicant will be required to pass a security clearance.

Prospective applicants should send the information below to info@governanceinnovation.org:

• A full academic CV, demonstrating relevant experience, knowledge of methods and publications (if any).

• A two page description of how they intend to approach the problem in one or more of the three topics mentioned above.

For further information about the research project please contact Professor Lorenzo Fioramonti (lorenzo.fioramonti@governanceinnovation.org ), Dr. Duarte Goncalves (dgoncalv@csir.co.za)  or Dr. Christopher Nshimbi (chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org).

Regions without borders

Extended deadline for abstracts: “Autochthony, Allochthony and Belonging”

Regions without borders

 

“Autochthony, Allochthony and Belonging: Migration, Xenophobia and Social Cohesion in the Southern African Region”

Migration is not new in the Southern African region. Its long history dates back to the late 19th century into the colonial, post-independence and post-Cold War eras, and into the late 1980s and early 1990s when most economies in Southern Africa underwent neoliberal economic reforms and structural adjustments. The economic reforms coincided with the end of apartheid in South Africa. South Africa’s emergence as the economic hub of Southern Africa coupled with the long history of migration across Southern Africa makes South Africa a destination of choice for various categories of migrants including labour, informal traders, medical, education and training, cultural and kinship relations, etc. The post-reform and post-apartheid period has thus witnessed increased immigration into South Africa from Southern and other parts of Africa. The increase in numbers of immigrants in South Africa has created tensions and hostilities directed towards immigrants. The African immigrants in South Africa have thus been constructed as the problematic new comers who take away jobs from South Africans and strain the national socioeconomic infrastructure, pressuring government and limiting its ability to provide essential socioeconomic services and employment to its citizens. This social topography, which has elevated South African citizens and led to the relegation of immigrants to the subaltern, with calls for their evisceration and interpellation, partly explains the so-called xenophobia and discourse around xenophobic attacks currently prevalent in South Africa since the early 2000s. While foreigners and agencies such as the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) brand targeted attacks on foreigners and their businesses by South African citizens as xenophobia, South African authorities rather brand such attacks as acts of criminality, or even ‘Afrophobia’, and not xenophobic. Against this background, this session proposes to (a) gain a proper understanding and conceptualisation of the notion xenophobia and (b) deliberate ways in which social cohesion can be promoted to encourage harmony between foreigners and South African citizens. The dearth of scholarly engagement in academia and policy attention in government circles around regional migration, xenophobia, local integration and social cohesion in Southern Africa makes engaging in this discourse imperative.

 

SUBMISSION PROCEDURES:

Please follow Congress website link below to register and submit your abstract (200-250 words). On the Abstract Submission page your “Intended Session” will be listed under Political Geography. Check the “Autochthony, Allochthony and Belonging: Migration, Xenophobia and Social Cohesion in the Southern African Region” box to proceed with your submission.

 

WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION:

 

http://www.igc2016.org/dct/page/70047

Conference Date: 21-25 August 2016, Beijing China

Deadline for Abstract Submission: 31 March 2016

Notification of Acceptance: 30 April 2016

Deadline for Early bird Registration: 15 May 2016

 

Further information:

Dr. Inocent Moyo

Research Fellow: Department of Geography

UNISA, Florida Campus

Tel: +27 72 106 2632

Email: minnoxa@yahoo.com

 

Or

 

Dr. Christopher C. Nshimbi

Research Fellow & Deputy Director: Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn)

Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria

Tel: +27 12 420 4152

Email: chris.nshimbi@governanceinnov

 

Regions without borders

Call for Abstracts for the 33rd International Geographical Congress: Shaping our Harmonious Worlds

Regions without borders

Call for abstracts

 

 

“Sociocultural Encounters in Geography: Borders, Borderlands, Grassroots Non-State Actors and the Southern African Regional Integration Project”

The geographical and socio-economic landscapes of the contiguous border areas in Southern African suggest de facto processes of regional integration. The historical, socio-economic and cultural interactions, enhanced by geography, that characterise these borderlands form sub-regions that not only defy border controls but also achieve alternative processes of regional integration. This has not received much scholarly attention and recognition from policy makers. Therefore, this session takes, as its point of departure, the debates around borders, borderlands, sub-and regional integration and aims to interrogate the place of local, grassroots non-State actors and their rich historical, socioeconomic and cultural interactions facilitated by geographic proximity in Southern Africa’s borderlands, in the SADC’s regional integration project. Hence the questions; do “spaces of flows” replace “spaces of places” in Southern Africa’s borderlands? Are economic regions outside formal state organisation likely to emerge in these contiguous border areas? Contrary to top down approaches to regional integration, the session will explore alternative approaches to regional integration in the SADC and advance perspectives that question current thinking and conceptualization of regional integration in the Southern African region and in Africa, in general. Several questions shall, therefore, be explored such as: how does the role of grassroots non-State actors in the Southern African region compare with other parts of the world?

SUBMISSION PROCEDURES:
Please register and submit your abstract (200-250 words) at the IGC China 33rd International Geographical Congress website by following the link below. On the Abstract Submission page your “Intended Session” will be listed under Political Geography. Check the “Sociocultural Encounters in Geography: Borders, Borderlands, Grassroots Non-State Actors and the Southern African Integration Project” box and proceed with your submission.

WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION:
http://www.igc2016.org/dct/page/70047

DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING ABSTRACTS:
15 February 2016

CONFRENCE DATES
21-25 August 2016, Beijing China

NOTIFICATION OF THE RESULTS OF THE ABSTRACT REVIEW:
16 April 2016

For further information please contact:

Dr. Christopher C. Nshimbi
Research Fellow & Deputy Director: Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn)
Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria
Tel: +27 12 420 4152
Email: chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org; christopher.nshimbi@up.ac.za

Or

Dr. Inocent Moyo
Research Fellow: Department of Geography
UNISA, Florida Campus
Tel: +27 72 106 2632
Email: minnoxa@yahoo.com

Civil Society and World Regions

Civil society and world regions

 

Civil Society and World Regions
How Citizens Are Reshaping Regional Governance in Times of Crisis

Edited by Lorenzo Fioramonti

Contributions by Chukwudi David Anyanwu; Mercedes Botto; Alan Collins; Antonio Fiori; Andréas Godsäter; Okechukwu C. Iheduru; Sunhyuk Kim; Helen E.S. Nesadurai; Marco Pinfari; Jan Aart Scholte and Andy Storey

(Lexington Books, 2015)

Supranational regionalism and regional integration have for a long time been top-down processes, led by the few and imposed on the many. The role of citizens, especially those active in civil society, has been neglected by scholars, students, and commentators of regionalism. In reaction to the prevalence of these top-down models, a “new regionalism” approach has proliferated in the past few years. This book aims to further develop such a research agenda by providing an up-to-date overview of the contribution of civil society to world regionalism, from Europe to Africa, Asia, and the Americas. This is not only relevant as a research topic; it is also of critical importance from a political standpoint. As regions across the world experience prolonged governance crises, it becomes paramount to understand the extent to which these new regional formations actually reflect the interests and needs of their people. While old regionalism was accepted as a de facto elite-driven byproduct of both the Cold War and neoliberal globalization, the twenty-first-century regionalism—if it is to survive—will need to refocus its objectives through new forms of participation and inclusion. Regions without citizens are unlikely to stand the test of time, especially in times of crises.