Posts

“The Future of Democracy in Europe and Africa”

 

 

screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-12-22-16-pm

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) invites you to the Rethinking Development  seminar on the topic “The Future of Democracy in Europe and Africa” Presented by Professor Leonardo Morlino.

Leonardo Morlino is Professor of Political Science and Deputy Vice Chancellor at LUISS University, Italy. He’s one of the world’s leading experts of democracy and democratization and was President of the International Political Science Association (IPSA) (2009‐12). He is the author of more than 30 books and more than 200 journal essays and book chapters published in English, French, German, Spanish, Hungarian, Chinese, Mongolian, and Japanese. His most recent books include Changes for Democracy (Oxford UP, 2011). He was also one of the three editors of the International Encyclopedia of Political Science (8 voll., Sage Publications, 2011), which won the Honorable Mention of Darthmouth Medal for reference publishing in all domains of knowledge. Morlino is directing a new research project on the impact of the global economic crisis on democracy.

Date: Monday, 24 October 2016
Time: 17:30‐19:30
Venue: GovInn Headquarters, Old College House, University of Pretoria Main Campus (Hatfield). Building no. 24 on the attached map.
RSVP essential: contact Neil Kasselman (neil.kasselman@governanceinnovation.org) by 20 October 2016.

UP-Campus-Map-GovInn-building-24

 

24-10-2016-future-of-democracy-in-europe-and-africa-leonardo-morlino-invite
The eventswas co-hosted by SIWI, GovInn and the WRC

Watch GovInn associate fellow Quraysha Ismail Sooliman’s interview with Dr Rajendra Singh

Rajenda Singh and Lorenzo Fioramonti

Rajenda Singh and Lorenzo Fioramonti

Famed water conservationist and activist Dr Rajendra Singh, known as the “water man of India”, sat down with GovInn associate fellow Quraysha Ismail Sooliman proir to his presentation at the GovInn rethinking development seminar, “The power of Community: Water security in times of scarcity”. They discuss the conservation methods employed in his native Rajasthan, sustainable solutions to water management and the policies that should accompany such initiatives. To watch follow the link here

The eventswas co-hosted by SIWI, GovInn and the WRC

Rethinking Development Seminar: ‘The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity’

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation hosted the Rethinking Development seminar titled ‘The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity’, together with the Stockholm International Water Institute and the Water Research Commission. Mr. Rajendra Singh, The Water Man of India, presented his work on community-led initiatives to conserve water:

Rajendra Singh is a well-known water conservationist. Also known as “Water Man of India”, he won the Stockholm Water Prize in 2015. Previously, he won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for community leadership in 2001 for his pioneering work in community-based efforts in water harvesting and water management. He has been instrumental in fighting slow bureaucracy and  mining lobbies and has helped villagers take charge of water management in their semi-arid areas through the use of ‘johad’, rainwater storage tanks, check dams and other time-tested as well as path-breaking techniques. He is one of the members of the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) under the Indian Ministry of the Environment. In 2008, The Guardian named him as one of the “50 people who could save the planet”.

Please find the pictures taken at this seminar below.

 

New Rules for Global Justice: Structural Redistribution in the Global Economy

New-Rules-for-Global-Justice-1

Published by Rowman & Littefield GovInn Director Prof. Lorenzo Fioramonit’s new book will be launched at ISA in April in Atlanta, Georgia. Co edited by Jan Aart Scholte, faculty Professor in Peace and Development in the school of Global Studies at the University of Gothenburg and Alfred Nhema, Chief Executive Officer at the Pan African Development Center the book explores global equality and distribution in relation to states, class, gender and race using examples drawn from nations like Zimbabwe and Australia. It presents proposals to mitigate public discontent with global inequality via “new rules” which can overcome issues of finance, food security, migration, climate change and corruption.

 

“The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity

Invitation-5 (2)

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and SIWI invite you to a Rethinking Development Seminar

“The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity”

Presented by Rajendra Singh, The Water Man of India

Rajendra Singh is a well-known water conservationist. Also known as “Water Man of India”, he won the Stockholm Water Prize in 2015. Previously, he won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for community leadership in 2001 for his pioneering work in community-based efforts in water harvesting and water management. He has been instrumental in fighting slow bureaucracy and  mining lobbies and has helped villagers take charge of water management in their semi-arid areas through the use of ‘johad’, rainwater storage tanks, check dams and other time-tested as well as path-breaking techniques. He is one of the members of the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) under the Indian Ministry of the Environment. In 2008, The Guardian named him as one of the “50 people who could save the planet”.

Date: Thursday 3 March 2016
Time: 14:00-16:00 PM
Venue: GovInn Headquarters, Old College House, University of Pretoria Main Campus (Hatfield)

RSVP essential: Contact Neil Kasselman neil.kasselman@governanceinnovation.org by 29 February 2016.

Lorenzo's article in the Business Day, 26 January 2016

“SA must rethink economics and build a new social contact”,, Business Day, 26 January 2016

Lorenzo's article in the Business Day, 26 January 2016

Lorenzo’s article in the Business Day, 26 January 2016

By GovInn Director Professor Lorenzo Fioramonti

 

In his new Business Day article, Professor Lorenzo Fioramonti discusses the social ills that are facing South Africa, which have been exacerbated in the past few months by environmental and economic challenges, and the need to change the way we approach these problems together as South Africans.

As some university negotiations have demonstrated, different parties can come to a satisfactory agreement involving resizing of salaries, benefits and other contributions when it becomes clear that the future of a public good — education — is at stake. There is no reason to believe that the same cannot happen for the economy at large.

We need new rules of engagement and a new social contract to move forward. If done properly and with a clear vision, this will make everybody more confident about the future of this country, reassuring its citizens (of all races and colours), as well as those foreign investors interested in the long-term wellbeing of the economy (not the speculators who have always been so keen to make money at the expense of our society).

 

To read the whole article, go the Business Day website.

Say goodbye to capitalism: Welcome to the Republic of Wellbeing, The Guardian 02.09.2015

New Zealand’s Whanganui River

In 2012, New Zealand’s Whanganui River became a legal entity with a legal voice.

GovInn Director Lorenzo Fioramonti and his colleagues in the Alliance for Sustainability and Prosperity have co-authored an article for The Guardian on their vision of a global governance transformation that will create governments committed to pursuing the Sustainable Development Goals of the post 2015 agenda.

 

Authored by: Lorenzo Fioramonti, Enrico Giovannini, Robert Constanza, Ida Kubiszewski, Kate Pickett, Kristin Vala Ragnarsdottir, Roberto de Vogli and Richard Wilkinson

Imagine a country genuinely committed to pursuing the sustainable development goals (SDGs), set to be agreed on by the international community later this month. It would place emphasis on human and ecosystem wellbeing as the ultimate objective of progress. This country – let’s call it the Republic of Wellbeing – and its business sector would need to embark on a profound transformation to achieve durable, long-term change.

Around the world today, companies and governments do precisely the opposite: they put more emphasis on short-term economic dynamics, or what Hillary Clinton criticised as “quarterly capitalism”. If we are serious about meeting the SDGs then this cannot continue.

Read the full article at The Guardian.

 

Jules and Raphael with the seminar guests.

“The Circular Economy… In Africa” by Jules Coignard and Raphael Masvigner

On the sixth leg of their round the world tour, Jules Coignard and Raphael Masvigner shared their findings so far on circular economic models or “closed loop” systems. Their vision is to educate people on the transitions that take place from the linear to the circular model, and the relevance that the circular economic principles have across all disciplines and in all sectors. The French economist can be followed on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram under the company Circul-R or visit their website as they continue their 22 country, 17 month tour.

Jules and Raphael with the seminar guests.

Jules and Raphael with the seminar guests.

Jules Coignard discussing the circular economy.

Jules Coignard discussing the circular economy.

Rediscussing rural change in Sub-Saharan Africa, with Bruno Losch – Rethinking development seminar

Rural diversification in sub-Saharan Africa has been one of the most debated issues over the last 15 years. On 18 March 2015 at the University of Pretoria, Dr Bruno Losch, Political Economist and lead Researcher at CIRAD, will discuss the survey results provided by the World Bank led program RuralStruc.
Rethinking-Development-Seminar-Series-invite-17-March-2015

Monitoring and evaluation of a participative planning process for the integrated management of natural resources in the uThukela District Municipality (South Africa)

Monitoring and evaluation of a participative planning process for the integrated management of natural resources in the uThukela District Municipality (South Africa)
By Mélanie POMMERIEUX, Magalie BOURBLANC, Raphaële DUCROT

Working paper No. 2014/1 May 2014

Rethinking development series: Working Paper 1 Abstract
This paper intends to monitor the changes in perceptions and behaviour of stakeholders induced by the Afromaison participatory process, which is aimed particularly at helping to integrate natural resource management in the uThukela District Municipality, South Africa.
To do so, an evaluation protocol has been designed, combining social sciences as well as evaluation techniques. This protocol has been applied to both the initial assessment and the monitoring of the first workshop involving various local stakeholders held under the Afromaison project. The initial assessment showed that it was possible to regroup stakeholders’ perceptions into categories according to the functions those actors occupy. Most of those interviewees lacked a holistic understanding of the state of natural resources in the area, and had issues collaborating well with other stakeholders. By monitoring the first workshop, we found that almost half of the participants did not contribute their opinion because they expected getting information rather than actively participating in order to reach a common vision. This monitoring revealed however changes in the normative and cognitive functions of participants. Two interviews conducted few weeks after this workshop tend to indicate that those changes might be long-term. A final evaluation conducted at the end of Afromaison should help us verifying this finding.

Read and download the working paper here: RETHINKING DEVELOPMENT WP 2014-1 – Bourblanc et al.

The Rethinking Development working paper series has been designed to push conventional boundaries in development research and public discourse. This series engages academics, policy makers and development practitioners to critically reflect on old and new development alternatives and how they impact the society we all live in.