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Determinants and drivers of migration in Africa (MIGRAFRICA)

The objective of the research project MIGRAFRICA (Determinants and drivers of migration in Africa) is to develop a regional overview of the main determinants and drivers of migration in SSA focusing on the structural causes of rural out-migration. It presents the main finding analytically and graphically in a working paper, an in-depth case study and an Atlas focused on the main migratory trends and drivers from, across and to SSA. The publications will be in both English and French.

An outcome is the FAO-CIRAD-GOVINN Atlas ‘Rural Africa in motion. Dynamics and drivers of migration South of the Sahara’.

Contacts

sara.mercandalli@cirad.fr

Economic and Sociocultural Encounters in Borders: Experiences from Southern Africa, Perspectives from Europe, Asia and South America

This project is situated within debates on borders, borderlands, sub- and regional integration. It examines local, grassroots and non-state actors and their cross-border economic and sociocultural encounters and contestations. And the role they play in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region and its integration project. The project also deliberately includes perspectives on borders, borderlands and integration in other world regions including Europe, Asia and South America. The aim is to not only enhance the understanding of Southern African borders, but also contribute to the attempts and formulations by scholars, policymakers, practitioners and ordinary people to make sense of the lines that seem to so easily separate and box people into mutually exclusive categories.

Project leaders: Dr Chris Nshimbi, Dr Inocent Moyo (University of Zululand), Dr Jussi Laine (University of Eastern Finland).

 

Contacts

Chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org

African Borders, Human Mobility, Continental Integration and Development

This project interrogates mobility issues affecting ordinary people and economically active human resources within and across the borders of Africa’s disparate states. It also explores the dynamics of cooperation and the governance of trans-boundary natural resources. This is in a quest to examine the relationship between the spatial mobility of borders and development, as well as the migration regimes within which states that share contiguous borders in given geographic territories are embedded.

Project leaders: Dr Chris Nshimbi, Dr Inocent Moyo (University of Zululand).

 

Contacts

Chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org

Africa-EU Relations, Migration, Development and Integration (AEMDI)

The Africa-EU relations, migration, development and integration (AEMDI) project aims to bring into conversation leading academics, policymakers, political observers and practitioners from civil society to explore and examine intra-Africa migration on one hand and EU-Africa relationships vis-à-vis migration on the other hand. Efforts to integrate Africa, through the RECs, should, then, be informed by lessons and parallels drawn from across Africa, and chiefly, the integration experience of the EU—particularly the Schengen Area—in moving from free movement of labour (only) to EU citizenship, as enshrined in Article 20 (1) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. The main outcome of AEMDI is the promotion of the Jean Monnet Programme and adoption of best practices from the EU’s successes in regional integration, in Africa. AEMDI aims increased networking and expertise between/of academics, policymakers, professionals and relevant stakeholders in Africa and the EU. AEMDI responds to the need to promote development and well-being in Africa through, among other things, learned experiences from observed successes in EU integration.

Project leaders: Dr Chris Nshimbi, Dr Inocent Moyo (University of Zululand), Dr Jussi Laine (University of Eastern Finland), and Dr. Tabani Ndlovu (Nottingham Trent University)

 

Contacts

Chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org

African Voices from the Ground

This research project focuses on collecting information from citizens and civil society organizations, in addition to government officials and professionals working on migration issues in migrant communities. It aims to gather data from these “voices on the ground” through systemic research methods in four countries representing four regions of Africa: Senegal (West Africa), South Africa (Southern Africa), Mali (Sahel) and Ethiopia (Horn of Africa). It includes voices of civil society into the dialog on migration; establish a continuous migration platform, offering understanding of migration issues; establish a network among groups working on migration at regional level and beyond, at global level; discuss and develop long-term approaches on migration; develop policy recommendations for African decision makers; and develop specific recommendations for the EU-Africa partnership. focused on collecting information from citizens and civil society organizations, in addition to government officials and professionals working on migration issues in those communities.

Project leaders: Professor Amr Abdalla (Addis Ababa University), Professor Kassahun Berhanu (Addis Ababa University), Ms Firehiwot Sintayehu (Addis Ababa University), Dr Kevin Eze (University of the Sahel), and Dr Chris Nshimbi.

 

Contacts

Chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org

Building Regions from Below

This research investigates the activities of informal cross-border traders and migrants in the COMESA-EAC-SADC Tripartite Free Trade Area, with a specific focus on the SADC region. It seeks to understand the contribution of these actors to the broader integration of the said regions. Special attention is given to persons living in the proximate communities, towns, etc. of the contiguous border areas of the countries that form the tripartite FTA.

 

Contacts

chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org

Cori Wielenga

ZOPACAS at 30: Its formation, potential and limitations

This research project seeks to stimulate the broadening of the scientific-academic debate over the current and potential configuration of the Zone of Peace and Cooperation of the South Atlantic (ZOPACAS), both within the context of Brazilian interests and in the framework of increasing international focus over South Atlantic dynamics. With over 30 years of existence, ZOPACAS accounts today for a singular case of a multilateral platform, transversal to multiple global developments in the last few decades. Its institutional resilience associated to a characteristically legal singularity in terms of other multilateral experiences as well as an express desire to widen its thematic range of action, make this forum a noticeable case study. That relevance, in turn, only increases if we also consider the underlined notion of a supposedly common perception of an oceanic region, as an aggregating element of South American and African countries, as well as its passive contribution – never really challenged or tested – to regional security and stability.

ZOPACAS flag
On the other hand, the pre-salt discoveries, the resurgence of the Brazilian defense industry, the bet on South-South relations and the political-commercial investments in Africa also incited Brazil to concern itself once again with developments in the South Atlantic. It is therefore understandable why the progressive reinforcement of ZOPACAS is considered relevant to Brazil’s own defense, as mentioned by the Defense White Book, and inter-relates easily with the national foreign policy domain.
In this context, while combining an historical balance (1986-2016) with a structural evaluation of the current limits, capacities and eventual potentialities of ZOPACAS, this project thus seeks to provide a complete and deepened perspective of a regional mechanism, frequently neglected by academic literature and never fully researched in its totality. Moreover, it seeks to answer the increasing demand, both internal and external, for detailed information over ZOPACAS and provide greater substance to the national decision-making process regarding Brazil’s active participation in such a multilateral body.

GovInn researcher: Frank Mattheis

Partner institutions: University of Brasilia (Brazil), Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), University of Lisbon (Portugal), University of Rosario (Argentina)

Funding institutions: Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) and the Brazilian Defence Ministry’s Pandiá Calógeras Institute

Funding period: January 2015 to December 2016