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Article ‘Inclusive Businesses and Land Reform: Corporatization or Transformation?’ by Chamberlain and Anseeuw in Land

GovInn’s Associate Fellows Wytske Chamberlain and Ward Anseeuw published the Open-Access article ‘Inclusive Businesses and Land Reform: Corporatization or Transformation?‘ in the journal Land.

Inclusive businesses (IBs), embodying partnerships between commercial agribusinesses and smallholder farmers/low-income communities, are considered to contribute towards rural development and agricultural sector transformation. Structured as complex organizational set-ups consisting of, and overcoming the limitations of, standard inclusive instruments (collective organization, mentorship, supply contract, lease/management contract and equity), they allow for the inclusion of smallholders and low-income communities into commercial agricultural value chains. IBs are a way for governments to engage private agribusinesses in agricultural and rural policies. However, will the commercial sector, through IB partnerships, contribute towards the government’s transformation and developmental objectives? Based on case studies in South Africa—a country engaged in land and agrarian reforms—the effects of IBs at the project level appear positive, illustrated by an increase in production and growth in agricultural assets. However, individual beneficiaries experience only a marginal change in income and livelihoods. Whereas land reform, project development and market integration are generally achieved, the transformation and beneficiary development objectives are compromised. Although commercial agribusinesses contribute to investment needs in the sector and smallholder exposure to commercial markets, IB partnerships allow commercial entities control over the smallholders’ assets. Ownership and secure rights, especially of land, and support of external parties to capacitate beneficiaries and adjust power asymmetries, are essential starting points. Without these aspects, IBs will not lead to effective transformation and development.

Read the full article here: http://www.mdpi.com/2073-445X/7/1/18

 

 

AFGROLAND workshop at GovInn on large agricultural investment and agro-food-energy changes, 15-18.01.2018

GovInn hosts a workshop consolidating the results of the AFGROLAND project on the 15th-18th January. The AFGROLAND project is funded by the BELMONT forum, the South African NRF, the French ANR and the Swiss FNSFN and looks at ‘African Food, Agriculture, Land and Natural Resource Dynamics, in the context of global agro-food-energy system changes’. Extensive field research on large agricultural investments was conducted in Mozambique, Kenya, and Madagascar.

More information about AFGROLAND can be found here: http://afgroland.net/Pages/default.aspx

‘Migration and resilience of rural households’ livelihoods in the face of changing political and economic contexts: The case of South Mozambique (1900–2010)’, by Sara Mercandalli, 08.07.2017

GovInn’s Senior Researcher Sara Mercandalli published, together with Ward Anseeuw, the article ‘Migration and resilience of rural households’ livelihoods in the face of changing political and economic contexts: The case of South Mozambique (1900–2010)‘ in the Journal African Studies.

This article investigates how labour migrations of rural households from Leonzoane in Southern Mozambique have changed since the colonial period to a post-war (1992) and post-apartheid (1994) context and their links with livelihoods restructuring. It draws on a qualitative analysis of the features of labour migrations, through a sample of households on five generations. Results reveal the evolution of men’s forms of mobility from longstanding circular and formal migrations to South Africa’s mines, toward multi-sited, informal, and more flexible migrations into mining and other sectors. These renewed forms of mobility are a core element of households’ livelihoods restructuring, as part of strategies to adapt the changing political-economic constraints of the broader globalising environment in terms of increasing informal and volatile labour conditions. The article concludes with a call for further analysis and integration of migration features in development policies.

Read the full article here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00020184.2017.1322868

The quiet rise of medium-scale farmers in Malawi

The Quiet Rise of Medium-Scale Farms in Malawi

Ward Anseeuw and John Kotsopoulos, along with Thomas Jayne and Richard Kachule published a paper on Land Vol 5, No19

 

Abstract

Medium-scale farms have become a major force in Malawi’s agricultural sector. Malawi’s most recent official agricultural survey indicates that these account for over a quarter of all land under cultivation in Malawi. This study explores the causes and multifaceted consequences of the rising importance of medium-scale farms in Malawi. We identify the characteristics and pathways of entry into farming based on surveys of 300 medium-scale farmers undertaken in 2014 in the districts of Mchinji, Kasungu and Lilongwe. The area of land acquired by medium-scale farmers in these three districts is found to have almost doubled between 2000 and 2015. Just over half of the medium-scale farmers represent cases of successful expansion out of small-scale farming status; the other significant proportion of medium-scale farmers are found to be urban-based professionals, entrepreneurs and/or civil servants who acquired land, some very recently, and started farming in mid-life. We also find that a significant portion of the land acquired by medium-scale farmers was utilized by others prior to acquisition, that most of the acquired land was under customary tenure, and that the current owners were often successful in transferring the ownership structure of the acquired land to a long-term leaseholding with a title deed. The study finds that, instead of just strong endogenous growth of small-scale famers as a route for the emergence of medium-scale farms, significant farm consolidation is occurring through land acquisitions, often by urban-based people. The effects of farmland acquisitions by domestic investors on the country’s primary development goals, such as food security, poverty reduction and employment, are not yet clear, though some trends appear to be emerging. We consider future research questions that may more fully shed light on the implications of policies that would continue to promote land acquisitions by medium-scale farms.

The article, which belongs to the “Special Issue Changing Land Use, Changing Livelihoods” can be downloaded here

Note: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Book launch: ‘South Africa’s Agrarian Question’ by Hubert Cochet, Ward Anseeuw and Sandrine Fréguin-Gresh

South Africa’s Agrarian Question

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation invites you to the upcoming book launch of Govinn’s director Ward Anseeuw co-edited book ‘South Africa’s Agrarian Question’, by Hubert Cochet, Ward Anseeuw and Sandrine Fréguin-Gresh.

“The answers provided in this book will be of interest not only to all those interested in the South African experiment, but also to those who, in all regions, are questioning the mainstream agrifood regime and asking how it can be transformed.” – Olivier De Schutter, Former UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food (2008–2014); Co-Chair, International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems; Member of the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

 

Date: Tuesday, 19 April 2016
Time: 17:00 – 19:00
Venue: GovInn Headquarters, Old College House, University of Pretoria Main Campus (Hatfield)
RSVP essential: http://goo.gl/forms/YkBZG6g5hE by 15 April 2016.
Queries: info@governanceinnovation.org

More information on the book can be found on the Governance Innovation website and the Publisher website.

Book-Launch-19-April

Book: ‘South Africa’s Agrarian Question’ by Hubert Cochet, Ward Anseeuw and Sandrine Fréguin-Gresh

South Africa’s Agrarian Question

South Africa’s Agrarian Question, by Hubert Cochet, Ward Anseeuw and Sandrine Fréguin-Gresh, to be published by HSRC Press this month:

Based on an in-depth analysis of several contrasting agricultural regions, this book aims to assess South Africa’s ongoing agrarian reform and the country’s agrarian dynamics.

The conclusion is without doubt: 20 years after the first democratic elections, the country’s land pattern remains almost unchanged, and primary agriculture and its broader value-chains are more concentrated than ever. Without fundamentally questioning the highly specialised, fossil energy and synthetic input dependent, oligopolistic entrepreneurial agricultural production model, which is presently structuring the sector and is guiding the reforms, a more equitable redistribution of resources and value-addition will by no means be possible.

The answers provided in this book will be of interest not only to all those interested in the South African experiment, but also to those who, in all regions, are questioning the mainstream agrifood regime and asking how it can be transformed – Olivier De Schutter

This book examines and contributes to the structural questions that underpin the current stagnation of South Africa’s agrarian reform. Presenting fresh approaches in analysing agrarian issues and tools to assess farming systems and agricultural development, this incisive study will be an important resource to policy makers, academics and those with an interest in agrarian reform.

More information on the book can be found here.