GOVINN WEEK SEMINAR: Pragmatic peace-making for innovative governance and social change, 26 September 2019

With Matt Meyer

Reviewing historical examples from governmental practices in Zambia, Tanzania, Mozambique, Eritrea and elsewhere, Meyer will lead a discussion on the connections between civil resistance, social change, and democracy in this interactive seminar. With reviews of contemporary struggles in Western Sahara and the Cameroons/Ambazonia, fundamental questions of decolonization, apartheid economics, and the roll of education will be addressed. Strategic questions relating to violence/nonviolence, patriarchy, white supremacy, identity issues, and the connections between ideology and pragmatism will also be covered.

DATE: 26 September 2019

TIME: 10:00 – 13:00

VENUE: Future Africa Campus

 

The Governance Innovation Week 2019: Programme

What – This week will bring critical scholars and practitioners together to debate and plan the future of governance and governance innovation in Africa and the world.
When – 25 – 27 September 2019
Where – Future Africa, University of Pretoria

NB: this list is non-exhaustive and will be updated continuously.

 

KEYNOTE PANEL:

Emancipatory governance: Views from the ground

Everisto Benyera, Marc Wegerif, Chris Nshimbi and Lebohang Liepollo Pheko
Facilitator: Quraysha Sooliman

25 September 2019, 18:00,
RSVP: Kirsty Agnew, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

A case for challenging conventional wisdom on governance?

with Dr Catherine Biira (Institute For Regional
Integration and Development, Catholic University of
Eastern Africa)

26 September 2019, 18:00
RSVP: Kirsty Agnew, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za


Workshops and Playshops:

The State of Food Governance in South Africa

25 September 2019
RSVP: Camilla Adelle, camilla.adelle@up.ac.za

More details here.

The objective of this one-day workshop will be to continue the existing policy debate on food insecurity in South Africa. It will review and discuss what is known about the policies and programmes relating to food and nutrition security at national and local levels of governance; identify the main knowledge gaps; and then debate the major issues preventing effective food security governance in the country.

Governance from Below: The Role of Non-state Actors in Africa

25 September 2019
RSVP: Kirsty Nepomuceno, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

More details here.

During this one-day event, which forms part of GovInn Week 2019, we will be exploring who the non-state actors in Africa are, the kind of power they hold, the interaction between non-state and state actors, and what relevance they have in terms of governance. Key debates on this day will be around the changing nature of the state, the emergence (or emerging interest) in non-state actors in governance, and the implications of these emerging actors for the future of the state and governance in Africa. Experts in the field will be sharing about emerging non-state actors in the mining industry, health sector, civil society sector and in relation to the sustainable development goals. The relationships between the state and mining companies, traditional leaders, healers, midwives and indigenous minorities will be explored. Presentations will be interspersed with an interactive participatory conference approach, where everyone in the room will get to share their views!

Pragmatic peacemaking for innovative governance and social change

with Matt Meyer

26 September 2019, 10:00 – 13:00

RSVP: Kirsty Nepomuceno, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

Reviewing historical examples from governmental practices in Zambia, Tanzania, Mozambique, Eritrea and elsewhere, Meyer will lead a discussion on the connections between civil resistance, social change, and democracy in this interactive seminar.

See more details here.

The Future of Governance in Africa – A Serious Playshop

26 – 27 September 2019, Invited participants only

What futures for governance in Africa?

 This 1 and a ½ day event brings together a diversity of participants from Africa who will engage in exploring issues related to governance in Africa beyond the conventional dichotomy between democracy and autocracy. Its purpose is to sense and make sense of what the present holds using the lights shed by exploring the future. It is designed to nurture a future-oriented perspective and create a collective knowledge on what governance could look like on the continent. This event takes the form of a serious “playshop” combining causal layered analysis and the futures triangle, which will help unveiling potential pockets of the future of governance in the present.

 

Ecological Economics and Governance of Natural Resources

27 September 2019

See more details here.

The session will be organized around different case studies on water and wildlife management in Africa. The presenters are current CEEPA doctoral students who will bring to the  discussion their current research questions and progress. Their methodological approaches are largely inspired by the ecological economics framework. However, the GovInn week provides an opportunity to discuss such approaches with a wider and more multidisciplinary audience.

Governance from below: The role of non-state actors in Africa

Governance from below: The role of non-state actors in Africa
Wednesday, 25 September

University of Pretoria’s Future Africa campus

During this one-day event, which forms part of GovInn Week 2019, we will be exploring who the non-state actors in Africa are, the kind of power they hold, the interaction between non-state and state actors, and what relevance they have in terms of governance. Key debates on this day will be around the changing nature of the state, the emergence (or emerging interest) in non-state actors in governance, and the implications of these emerging actors for the future of the state and governance in Africa. Experts in the field will be sharing about emerging non-state actors in the mining industry, health sector, civil society sector and in relation to the sustainable development goals. The relationships between the state and mining companies, traditional leaders, healers, midwives and indigenous minorities will be explored. Presentations will be interspersed with an interactive participatory conference approach, where everyone in the room will get to share their views!

There are still some places open for this event. If you want to join us, RSVP to cori.wielenga@up.ac.za.

Graduation of GovInn Doctoral Student Leon Mwamba from the University of Pretoria

We are happy to announce that GovInn Research Fellow, Leon Mwamba, successfully completed his studies and was awarded a PhD in Political Science from the University of Pretoria’s Department of Political Sciences. Dr Leon Mwamba received his PhD certificate at the graduation ceremony held in the AULA at the University last week Wednesday 4 September 2019. Congratulations Dr Mwamba!  Below is a summary of his thesis.

Leon Mwamba on the day of his graduation at the University of Pretoria.

Leon Mwamba on the day of his graduation at the University of Pretoria.

In his thesis, “People-centred Approaches to Regionalism: Southern African Civil Society Networks and SADC, 1989 to 2016”, Dr Leon Mwamba developed a typology of the kinds of institutional arrangements developed by regional civil society groups while interacting within both formal and self-organised regionalisms. He revealed that regional civil society networks that form part of a dominant formal process of regionalism exhibit different strategies, norms and rules than those that emerge out of contestation in opposition to formal regionalism. Dr Leon Mwamba demonstrated that regionalism can be viewed as an unconventional socio-political phenomenon, which can also be promoted by non-state actors like Southern African civil society networks in the SADC region. This implies, if well governed, self-organised regionalisms can also function equally well as formal regionalisms that are driven by state actors and technocrats. Dr. Leon Mwamba contributed to the literature on contemporary regionalism by expanding the focus of analysis to include non-state actors.

Journal Article: Political ecologies of water in South Africa: A literature review, by Magalie Bourblanc

In WIREs Water, GovInn researcher Dr Magalie Bourblanc and David Blanchon have published an article titled “Political ecologies of water in South Africa: A literature review”.

Abstract:

Given the existence of a thriving epistemic community on water sciences, the high politicization of environmental issues in the country as well as the active mobilization of a grassroot movement inspired by environmental justice, South Africa appears to be an ideal case to study the development of a political ecology (PE) approach. Moreover, since the apartheid regime, water issues have long represented a marker of extreme inequality.This paper aims at drawing a panorama of the PE of water in South Africa, its main topics and approaches. In our definition, the PE of water is concerned with human–environment relations, with explicit considerations for power relations. In the first section, we identified texts that, according to this definition, constitute the core of the PE of water in South Africa, going beyond a mere “politics of water.” In the second section and in the discussion, we undertook an in-depth analysis of the main topics addressed by authors, such as environmental flows, “free basic water policy,” prepaid water meters. PE of water is strongly connected to international debates about the link between water and power, but also capable of addressing in a critical way the specificities of the South African waterscape. It stems from this review that critical PE in urban settings in particular dominates the discipline. We could also note that the PE of water in rural areas tends to put a bigger emphasis on the “politics of ecology” whereas urban PE tends to focus more on the “ecology in politics,” although both thrive to examine the human–environment relations in an integrated manner.

 

You can read the full article here, or through the DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/wat2.1371

Seminar: Working toward SDG 16.1: Freedom from Violence in (South) Africa, 5 September 2019

South Africa is in the process of completing its first National Report within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in addition to presenting its Voluntary National Review at the UN High Level Political Forum in New York in July. The University of Pretoria has over the past six months been working with Stats SA to contribute to South Africa’s reports. In this symposium, scholars who have been involved in the process from the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the Freedom from Violence programme based in the Law Faculty, will provide insights related to the first target of the Goal – aimed at significantly reducing all forms of violence.  The presentations will range from the interconnections with South Africa’s National Development Plan, its recent White Paper on Safety and Security, to broader interventions extending across the continent, exploring the possibilities for broader armed violence reduction in post-conflict societies, and some of the challenges posed by a particular form of peace-building initiative Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR) initiatives.
Thursday 5 September 2019
10:00 – 13:00
Room 2-21, Law Faculty, University of Pretoria

Workshop Invitation: The State of Food Governance in South Africa, Wednesday, 25 September, 08:30-17:30

We would like to invite you to a workshop on ‘The State of Food Governance in South Africa’ on 25 September at the Future Africa Campus of the University of Pretoria. This event is part of the GovInn Week organised every two years by the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation.

The objective of this one-day workshop will be to continue the existing policy debate on food insecurity in South Africa. It will review and discuss what is known about the policies and programmes relating to food and nutrition security at national and local levels of governance; identify the main knowledge gaps; and then debate the major issues preventing effective food security governance in the country.

South Africa is food secure at the national level. However, food insecurity and malnutrition at the household level are high and the country has a poor record with regards to the prevalence of stunting, obesity and diet-related non-communicable diseases. Since 2002, a range of policies have attempted to address these high levels of food insecurity, yet food insecurity and malnutrition persist, which raises core concerns about the South African food system and its governance.

Please join us to discuss this critical policy problem currently facing South Africa. A draft programme can be found here.

RSVP by 5th September by following the link below

For more information please contact: camilla.adelle@up.ac.za, 083 260 4703

GovInn Working Paper 01/2019: The futures of rural migration in sub-Saharan Africa: A literature review and exploratory essay

GovInn researcher Dr Robin Bourgeois has contributed the first working paper of 2019 to the GovInn Working Papers series, titled “The futures of rural migration in sub-Saharan Africa: A literature review and exploratory essay”.

In a context where 200 million more people are expected to live in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) alone by 2050, the question of the futures of SSA rural migration is of crucial importance in a region which so far as remained essentially rural, in spite of a growing urbanization process. The first aim of this paper is to undertake a comprehensive review of the literature on the futures of rural migration in SSA. Drawing from 37 studies it provides a picture of anticipated drivers and migration patterns. It shows also that to our knowledge, rural migration in SSA is still largely an underexplored field of research. The second aim of this paper is therefore to provide some more insights about this question developing an essay drawing from general knowledge about population flows and specific scenario work connecting alternative global world orders and plausible scenarios of rural transformation into three alternative narratives about rural migration in SSA. This anticipatory work, with no predictive intention, provides some elements of thought regarding future migration patterns and briefly discuss governance-related implications.

 

To read the full working paper, download the document here.

The DOI for this paper is https://doi.org/10.18167/agritrop/00453.

“Creating knowledge democracy in South Africa: The role of communities of practice”, Camilla Adelle

GovInn research fellow, Dr Camilla Adelle, has published a commentary in the South African Journal of Science on “Creating knowledge democracy in South Africa: The role of communities of practice”.

 

In our pursuit of a more equitable, just and sustainable society, we must examine not only who makes decisions, but also on whose evidence these decisions are made. The question of whose knowledge is to be recognised, translated and incorporated into action is especially important in South Africa as universities attempt to respond to calls to decolonise the curricula. In this Commentary, I argue that widening the scope of knowledge production is an essential role that universities can play in creating knowledge democracy. Communities of practice are presented as a way in which scientists can cultivate research partnerships with stakeholders outside of science to co-produce knowledge needed to solve society’s current complex challenges.

 

The full commentary is available here.

Book cover

Re-Inventing Africa’s Development – Linking Africa to the Korean Development Model: 21 August

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation invites you to a conversation with the Ambassador of South Korea to South Africa Dr Jong-Dae Park, on his book Re-Inventing Africa’s Development – Linking Africa to the Korean Development Model.

The book analyses the development problems of sub-Sahara Africa (SSA) from the eyes of a Korean diplomat with knowledge of the economic growth Korea has experienced in recent decades. The author argues that Africa’s development challenges are not due to a lack of resources but a lack of management, presenting an alternative to the traditional view that Africa’s problems are caused by a lack of leadership. In exploring an approach based on mind-set and nation-building, rather than unity – which tends to promote individual or party interests rather than the broader country or national interests – the author suggests new solutions for SSA’s economic growth, inspired by Korea’s successful economic growth model much of which is focused on industrialisation.

The open access book is available here: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783030039455.

Date: Time: Venue: RSVP:

Wednesday, 21 August 2019
15:00 – 17:00
Seminar Room 1-09, Old College House, University of Pretoria Kirsty Nepomuceno, kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za