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Governance from below: The role of non-state actors in Africa

Governance from below: The role of non-state actors in Africa
Wednesday, 25 September

University of Pretoria’s Future Africa campus

During this one-day event, which forms part of GovInn Week 2019, we will be exploring who the non-state actors in Africa are, the kind of power they hold, the interaction between non-state and state actors, and what relevance they have in terms of governance. Key debates on this day will be around the changing nature of the state, the emergence (or emerging interest) in non-state actors in governance, and the implications of these emerging actors for the future of the state and governance in Africa. Experts in the field will be sharing about emerging non-state actors in the mining industry, health sector, civil society sector and in relation to the sustainable development goals. The relationships between the state and mining companies, traditional leaders, healers, midwives and indigenous minorities will be explored. Presentations will be interspersed with an interactive participatory conference approach, where everyone in the room will get to share their views!

There are still some places open for this event. If you want to join us, RSVP to cori.wielenga@up.ac.za.

“EU-Africa Migration Conundrum in a Changing Global Order”, 3-5 September 2018

At the beginning of September, from the 3rd to the 5th, the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation hosted a two day workshop and one day conference that focused on migration and human mobility with Africa and the European Union, and between the two regions. The event was hosted by GovInn Director, Dr Chris Nshimbi, and enjoyed input from a number of academics, practitioners and students, focused on the trends, impacts and future of migration in and between these regions.

Below are some pictures from the three days of engagement and dialogue.

Evaluating ‘home grown’ research networks in Africa.

GovInn’s Senior Researcher Camilla Adelle published together with Nico Elema, Ereck Chakauya and David Benson the article ” Evaluating ‘home grown’ research networks in Africa” in the South African Journal of Science.

 

Attempts to improve the policy environment have led to a growing pressure on governments in Africa to embark on policymaking that is more evidence based and considers a wide spectrum of scientific and indigenous knowledge. Local – or ‘homegrown’ – research networks on the continent can help strengthen the role of scientific knowledge in policymaking by increasing the capacity of researchers and by enhancing the visibility and communication of the research produced. While a large number of regional and sub-regional research networks have sprung up in Africa, the mere existence of networks does not guarantee their success. In reality, the impact of research networks on the science-policy interface depends on how well the networks operate in practice. We present a framework for evaluating the effectiveness of research networks in a way that is comparable across networks.

 

 

 

Read the full article here: https://www.sajs.co.za/article/view/4814

 

Regional governance regimes to foster labour mobility and development

GovInn Deputy Director, Chris Nshimbi, contributed an article on regional governance regimes and labour mobility in Africa in the latest issue of the ECDPM‘s Great Insights magazine.

Most international migration in Africa is intracontinental, essentially occurring between proximate states in the same regional bloc. It is mixed, but semi-skilled and unskilled labour migration, and mobility involving informal cross-border traders and service providers merit special attention.

Read the full article here: http://ecdpm.org/great-insights/migration-moving-backward-moving-forward/regional-governance-development-africa/

Economic and Sociocultural Encounters in Borders: Experiences from Southern Africa, Perspectives from Europe, Asia and South America

This project is situated within debates on borders, borderlands, sub- and regional integration. It examines local, grassroots and non-state actors and their cross-border economic and sociocultural encounters and contestations. And the role they play in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region and its integration project. The project also deliberately includes perspectives on borders, borderlands and integration in other world regions including Europe, Asia and South America. The aim is to not only enhance the understanding of Southern African borders, but also contribute to the attempts and formulations by scholars, policymakers, practitioners and ordinary people to make sense of the lines that seem to so easily separate and box people into mutually exclusive categories.

Project leaders: Dr Chris Nshimbi, Dr Inocent Moyo (University of Zululand), Dr Jussi Laine (University of Eastern Finland).

 

Contacts

Chris.nshimbi@governanceinnovation.org

“But where are the workers? How the youth entrepreneur model fails in Africa”, by Pierre Girard, December 2017

GovInn and CIRAD research fellow and PhD student Pierre Girard wrote an article for the University of the Witwatersrand’s Global Labour Column at the end of 2017. His article, entitled “But where are the workers? How the youth entrepreneur model fails in Africa” looks at the institutional structures in place to support youth employment in Africa, and where the continent is failing to ensure that entrepreneurs on the continent are properly supported.

The figures are now well known: 375 million young people will reach working age in Sub-Saharan Africa by 2030, and for many their livelihoods will depend mainly on the rural economy (Losch, 2016). Facing the massive generation of activity required by these demographic dynamics, entrepreneurship has become the leitmotiv of many donors’ and NGOs’ programmes and projects, as well as public policies. According to them, the multiplication of entrepreneurs can meet the employment challenge in the African countryside.

 

The article can be read in its entirety here. Or see below for the PDF version.

 

But where are the workers? by Pierre Girard

Launch of the Economic Report on Africa 2017, 02 November, 14:00

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) invite you to the launch of the Economic Report on Africa 2017.

Please find the invitation below, and access the program HERE.

ERA Launch flier

‘The Human Side of Regions: Informal Cross-border Traders in the Zambia–Malawi–Mozambique Growth Triangle and Prospects for Integrating Southern Africa’, by Chris Nshimbi, 23.10.2017

GovInn’s Co-Director Chris Nshimbi published the article ‘The Human Side of Regions: Informal Cross-border Traders in the Zambia–Malawi–Mozambique Growth Triangle and Prospects for Integrating Southern Africa‘ in the Journal of Borderlands Studies.

This paper examines the activities of informal cross-border traders (ICBTs) in the contiguous borderlands of Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique, in order to determine the replicability and feasibility of the growth triangle phenomenon, which was imported as a concept for economic development from Southeast Asia. It also seeks to establish whether ICBTs can satisfy their economic needs from cross-border trade. Apart from the thorough review of relevant literature, participant observations, face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions were deployed to collect the data for the analysis contained in the paper. Primary data from the fieldwork conducted at various locations in the borderlands is qualitatively and statistically analyzed. ICBTs in these areas include affiliates of traders’ associations and non-affiliates. The contiguous borderlands of the three countries comprise a young population of ICBTs with low incomes who have spent relatively few years in cross-border trade. ICBTs who have been longer in the informal trade business have graduated into formal traders. ICBT activities highlight their contribution to regional integration, from the bottom up. Informal cross-border trade provides employment and livelihoods, placing ICBTs outside extremely poor populations living below USD$1.25 per day. ICBTs also have innovative informal ways of accessing credit based on personal interactions and shared experiences with suppliers of goods. Legally establishing the growth triangle creates an environment that ICBTs exploit in order to satisfy their economic needs, especially with government facilitation.

Read the full article here http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/hshZedXfiiF9ytTf5dzm/full

‘Broadening the Debate on EU-Africa Relations’, by ESA-SSA, 20-21.07.2017

On July 20-21, scholars from every corner of Africa assembled at GovInn HQ for a workshop entitled “Broadening the Debate on EU-Africa Relations”. The aim of this ESA-SSA workshop was to advance perspectives on EU-Africa relations from Africa and the African diaspora. Scholars had an opportunity to scrutinise underexplored dimensions of the relationship as well as provide new insights into more established elements of the partnership. At the same time, the workshop represented a first effort at redressing the imbalance in scholarship on EU-Africa relations, which has hitherto been dominated by writing from Europe. Most importantly, new friendships were made and commitments to further collaborative research solidified. Stay tuned for more workshops to come!

 
ERGO Workshop 2017

‘The Continental Free Trade Area (CFTA) in Africa – A Human Rights Perspective’, by Chris Nshimbi

GovInn Deputy Director, Chris Nshimbi, working with an international team of researchers and experts has published the first ex-ante assessment of the proposed African continental free trade area (CFTA), using the HRIA (human rights impact assessment) tool. Chris brings to the team expertise on the informal economy, with a dedicated contribution on informal cross-border trade. The report provides nine evidence-based policy recommendations for negotiators of the CFTA.

 

 

 

Follow the link to access the report.
http://www.fes-globalization.org/geneva/documents/2017/2017_07_CFTA_HRIA_Publication.pdf

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