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Iris Nxumalo

Iris Nxumalo

Junior researcher

Iris Nxumalo completed her undergraduate degree in International Studies (Distinction) in 2013 and completed her honours degree in International Relations in 2014 (Distinction).

She has worked both in the capacity of tutor and Intern Lecturer in the Department of Political Sciences. Very passionate about the African continent, she seeks to make her contribution to the continent through policy-making, advocacy and academic work.

Research interests

  • African history and literature
  • Conflict and mediation practices
  • International policy making
  • The role of ethical leadership in African politics
  • Education and gender advocacy
  • Multilateral diplomacy and human security

Contact

Email: Iris.tintswalo@gmail.com

GovInn joins RISC

RISC logo
We are glad to announce that our Centre has joined RISC, the Consortium for Comparative Research on Regional Integration and Social Cohesion.

Founded in 2007, RISC gathers socially conscious research centres from all over the world. Through the creation of a cross-regional and interdisciplinary network RISC promotes the comparative examination of the human and environmental impacts of various aspects of regional integration across geographic areas and time periods. What sets RISC apart is its commitment to conduct research that could support social action projects in local communities.
GovInn researchers welcome the opportunity to contribute to a better understanding of the global political and economic challenges from the privileged observation point of Southern Africa.

Learn more about GovInn research projects
Learn more about RISC

World needs a new Bretton Woods with Africa in the lead – Business Day 27.11.2014

This week on Business Day, South Africa’s leading business newspaper, GovInn director Lorenzo Fioramonti reflects on the need to redefine the economic system and the very definition of economic progress.

“After the 2007-08 global economic collapse, we have not yet seen one major reform. Both bail-outs and quantitative easing (a cryptic term to hide the fact that governments have resorted to the old-fashioned, Zimbabwe-esque remedy of printing money out of thin air) have done exactly the opposite: they have condoned business-as-usual practices, providing an incentive for the financial sector to continue speculating.”

Our leaders make public appeals for more growth, but fail to specify what “type” of growth they want. While in the postwar period the world could have been satisfied with economic growth at all costs — most countries had been destroyed by the conflict and the future was simply about rebuilding — the new century has brought some critical reality checks. The planet is in pain, unbridled economic growth has increased inequalities in many countries and environmental damage has become a concern not only for tree-huggers, but for anybody interested in social and economic stability.

Read the full article on Business Day. 

Presentations from “Beyond GDP in Africa: Innovative ideas for a regional dashboard”

On 28-29 October 2014, GovInn, in partnership with the Sustainability Institute,  hosted a workshop that brought together academics and practitioners from statistical offices from Sub-Saharan Africa to identify practical solutions to measure well being and prosperity and move beyond numerical indicators such as GDP.

The title of the workshop was ‘Beyond-GDP in Africa: Innovative Ideas for a Regional Dashboard.’ Its goal was to take stock of the various criticisms raised against the gross domestic product (GDP) as a measure of economic progress and to propose a way forward for African countries.

Read and download the presentations given at the workshop: 

Why it’s time to leave GDP behind, by Robert Costanza

The GCRO BAROMETER 2014, by Darlington Mushongera

MEASURING DECENT WORK INDICATORS AND WORK STATISTICS, by Coffi Agossou

Environmental Economic Accounting Water Resource Accounting for South Africa, by Robert Parry

Gross National Happiness (GNH) in Bhutan, by Lise Pretorius

Why reversing Africa’s Resource Curse requires calculating natural capital accounts and ecological debt, by Patrick Bond

Update on the UN System of Environmental-Economic Accounting, by Mandy Driver

Developing a Diagnostic Tool and Policy Instrument for the Realisation of Decent Work, by Edward Webster

Beyond GDP: Towards a composite well-being index The case of the Green Economy Index , by Anton Nahman

Beyond GDP in Africa: Day 1 summary

Click here to download the workshop official statement 

The Will to Integrate: South Africa’s Responses to Regional Migration from the SADC Region

The African Development Review published a new paper by GovInn Chris Nshimbi and Lorenzo Fioramonti on how South Africa is responding to regional migration.

Abstract

This paper surveys frameworks of labour migration in southern Africa and determines South Africa’s policy responses to inflows of migrants from seven neighbouring countries. Legislations, policy reports and scientific publications on migration were thoroughly reviewed and interviews and correspondence with key policymakers were conducted. Statistical analyses of data on foreign worker recruitments and permits issued by South Africa’s Department of Home Affairs were also performed. The absence of a migration protocol in southern Africa suggests SADC Members have not implemented the African Union’s migration policy basic guidelines. Two systems coexist in southern Africa that complicate migration governance: a South Africa-managed bilateral migration policy, and aspirations for a formal SADC-managed migration policy. Bilateral agreements between South Africa and neighbours have established a labour migration system that dims prospects for a regional migration policy. SACU Members could establish a two-tier policy to achieve free movement while maintaining managed migration policy outside SACU. An official multilateral migration governance mechanism would serve SADC better than the current ad-hoc measures.

Read the full paper on the African Development Review

Beyond-GDP in Africa: Innovative Ideas for a Regional Dashboard

On October 28-29 2014, GovInn, in partnership with the Sustainability Institute,  hosted a workshop that brought together academics and practitioners from statistical offices from Sub-Saharan Africa to identify practical solutions to measure well being and prosperity and move beyond numerical indicators such as GDP.

The title of the workshop was ‘Beyond-GDP in Africa: Innovative Ideas for a Regional Dashboard.’ Its goal was to take stock of the various criticisms raised against the gross domestic product (GDP) as a measure of economic progress and to propose a way forward for African countries.

After two days of presentations and deliberations, the participants compiled a list of recommendations with a view to identifying a practical roadmap for the translation of the ‘beyond GDP’ debate into policy reforms throughout Africa.

Click here to download the presentations at the workshop

Click here to download the workshop official statement

Learn about Beyond GDP in Africa research project and about GovInn research on New Economy

Names and democracy in Southern Africa: the tale of two presidents

GovInn Researcher Chris Nshimbi compares the democratization processes of Zambia and Malawi on his latest post for the Nordic Africa Institut of Uppsala, Sweden.

“A few days after celebrating 50 years of independence in October, Zambia relived a sad history: the death of a second incumbent president to die in office in the space of six years.

Zambia is once again appearing as a beacon of peace in a violent and conflict ridden continent. However, the proof shall be in the transition with elections to be held 90 days after the president’s demise.

There are interesting comparisons to be made with neighbouring Malawi—the story less told about the successes of the evolving democratization in southern Africa.

Southern Africa needs committed politicians and senior bureaucrats that transcend personal interests to apply the principles of democracy and seek the firm establishment of state institutions.”

Read the full article on the Nordic Africa Development Policy Forum

Workshop on the EU’s External Environmental Policy

A three-day workshop on the EU’s external environmental policy was held at the University of Pretoria on 2-4 June as part of the GovInn Week 2015.

The EU has long been reported to be a global environmental leader and is party to the major international environmental treaties. However, apart from multi-lateral negotiations, the EU seeks to extend it environmental norms, rules and polices beyond its legal jurisdiction through a surprisingly large array of instruments, including: bilateral trade agreements, strategic partnerships, transnational policy networks, and development cooperation.

This workshop brought together a small group of top international scholars from around the world to explore how, where and to what effect the EU is embarking on new forms of external environmental governance.

 

 

The workshop programme is below:

Programme: The External Dimension of the European Union’s Environmental policy
2-4 June 2015, Graduate Centre,University of Pretoria, South Africa
Monday 1 June Arrival of international participants
Tuesday 2 June: Day One
08:30 – 09.00  Coffee and registration
Session 1
09:00 – 10:45 Opening remarks: Camilla Adelle, GovInn, University of Pretoria (South Africa)
“The external dimension of EU climate and energy policy”
John Vogler, Keele University (UK)
“The EU in international environmental negotiations” Tom Delreux, Institut de Sciences Politiques Louvain (UC Louvain)Read the policy brief adapted from Professor Delreux’s conference paper here.
Chair: Camilla Adelle, GovInn, University of Pretoria (South Africa)
10.45 – 11.15                 Coffee break
Session 2
11.15 – 13.00 The EU’s external governance tool box
“The European External Action Service”Diarmuid Torney, Dublin City University (Ireland) Read the policy brief adapter from Dr Torney’s conference paper here.
“EU climate diplomacy and the challenge of norm entrepreneurship”
Mai’a Davis Cross, Northeastern University (US)
Chair:  Navraj Singh Ghaleigh, University of Edinburgh (UK)
13.00 – 14.00                  Lunch
Session 3
14.00 – 15.45 The EU’s external governance tool box
“Can environmental standards in trade agreements be effective instruments of EU external environmental governance?” Evgeny Postnikov, University of Glasgow (UK) Read the policy brief adapted by Dr Postnikov’s from his conference paper here.
“Market-based instruments to support climate change objectives: Encouraging action on carbon taxes and emissions trading beyond Europe”, Sirini Withana, Konar Mutafoglu and Patrick ten Brink, Institute for European Environmental Policy (Belgium and UK)
“The Salience of EU Climate Law: Inspiration, Diplomacy by Law and ‘Learning by Doing’ in East Asia” Navraj Singh Ghaleigh, University of Edinburgh (UK)
Chair:  Mai’a Davis Cross, Northeastern University, US
15.45 – 16.30                Break
16.30 – 18.30 GovInn Week Keynote lecture: UP Conference Centre

“Poverty with added vitamins? Competing ways to govern the world food system”
Raj Patel, New York Times bestselling author of Stuffed and Starved and The Value of Nothing. Books available for sale.


18.30                             Reception: UP Conference Centre  
                                     (buses back to guest house)

 

08:30 – 09.00                  Coffee
Session 1
9.00 – 10.45 Country perspectives
“Making sense of the EU’s external climate change governance towards its southern neighbours”
Angelos Katsaris, College of Europe (Poland)“Integrating public participation into China’s environmental governance: The EU’s external influence”
Wen Xiang, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)
Chair: Tom Delreux, Institut de Sciences Politiques Louvain (UC Louvain)
10.45 – 11.15     Coffee Break
Session 2
11.15 – 13.00 Country perspectives
“The EU’s role in natural resource use in Africa” Oladiran Bello, South African Institute of International Affairs (South Africa)
“Contributions of the EU to the Construction of Latin American Environmental Governance” Roberto Dominguez, Suffolk University, Boston (USA)Read the policy brief adapted from Professor Dominguez’s conference paper here.
Chair: Sarah Delputte, University of Ghent (Belgium)
13.00 – 14.00                  Lunch
Session 3
14.00 – 15.45 Future Challenges
“The limits of leadership in a cold economic climate: Whither the EU as an environmental normative power?” Charlotte Burns and Paul Tobin, University of York (UK)
“Closing discussion: next steps”
Chair: John Vogler, Keele University (UK)
15.45-16.30                              Break
16.30 – 18.30 GovInn Keynote lecture: UP Conference Centre

“Within or beyond capitalism? Four scenarios for the emerging collaborative economy”

Michel Bauwens, founder of the Peer-To-Peer Foundation and author of Network Society and Future Scenarios for a Collaborative Economy.
Books available for sale.


18.30 Reception

Workshop on EU-Africa Relations

A one-day workshop reflecting on the state of EU-Africa relations will be held in early June at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. This will be the inaugural event of ESA-SSA.

Taking place in Africa, the workshop will capitalize on its geographic position to highlight views from the continent about this long-standing and sometimes problematic relationship. EU-Africa relations are moving beyond that of donor and client to reflect changing circumstances in Africa and Europe.

This workshop will highlight some of these changes, including the roles of African agency and innovation in changing the terms of the relationship. Focus will also be placed on multilateral issues that are of priority to Africans vis a vis the EU, such as migration, agriculture and protectionism, and peace and security cooperation.

Creative ideas on migration will open the doors to growth -Business Day SA-

“South Africa is the destination of many workers from the rest of Africa and from the rest of the world. We know that about 7% of SA’s workforce is foreign. More than 38% of workers in gold mines are non-South African citizens and more than 22% of mine workers in all sectors hail from Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland and Mozambique.

Data are sketchy and grossly underestimate the phenomenon. Many migrants are employed in informal positions, with precarious jobs, both in terms of safety and social security. Most undocumented migrant workers are poorly captured by official statistics. By all means, migrant workers are a fundamental factor in SA’s economic development. But how supportive and reliable is the present administrative and legislative framework?

What we need is a simple and clear framework to allow citizens of neighbouring countries to seek work and business opportunities in SA. We may even want to consider experimenting with free movement, for instance, within the Southern African Customs Union. In the European Union (EU), where free movement is a reality, most people have not relocated to other countries. As they benefit from clear arrangements that allow them to return regularly to their home country, they need not relocate permanently.”

In his regular column on Business Day, Lorenzo Fioramonti discusses how South Africa could transform its position of African immigration hub into an economic opportunity.

Read the full article on Business Day