Posts

Repatriating migrants misses the point. Systemic issues need to be tackled

In his latest Op-Ed in The Conversation, GovInn Deputy Director Chris Nshimbi says the decision to repatriate the migrants in precarious condition from Libya is a welcome pragmatic intervention that fails to consider the fundamental causes of human flight from Africa. Since the adoption of the plan, over 3,000 migrants have been repatriated to Gambia, Cameroon, Nigeria, Ivory Coast. The number falls short of the targeted 20,000 the AU wished to return within six weeks of adopting the plan.

Read the full article here: https://theconversation.com/repatriating-migrants-misses-the-point-systemic-issues-need-to-be-tackled-88809

Article ‘The EU-Africa summit is now the AU-EU summit. Why the upgrade matters’, by Frank Mattheis and John Kotsopolous, 04.12.2017

GovInn’s Senior Researchers Frank Mattheis and John Kotsopoulos published the article ‘The EU-Africa summit is now the AU-EU summit. Why the upgrade matters‘ in The Conversation

African and European heads of government gathered last week in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, for their 5th summit since 2000. For the first time, the African Union (AU) rather than “Africa”, officially appears as the European Union’s partner. While plenty has been discussed about youth, migration, security and governance less is being said about the shift from an EU-Africa to an AU-EU summit. Is this just a case of semantics? After all, the AU has been the key organiser of these triennial summits since they started in 2000. Or are there larger implications? We think there are.

 

Read the full article here: https://theconversation.com/the-eu-africa-summit-is-now-the-au-eu-summit-why-the-upgrade-matters-88185

Organisations like the African Union must find a way to monitor countries' environmental commitments.

“How Africa can up its game to meet environmental challenges”, The Conversation, 11 February 2016

“How Africa can up its game to meet environmental challenges”

Organisations like the African Union must find a way to monitor countries' environmental commitments.

Organisations like the African Union must find a way to monitor countries’ environmental commitments.

Read Camilla Adelle’s latest contribution to the discussion surrounding Africa’s environmental roles and responsibilities.

“Africa has enormous natural resource wealth. At the same time it is extremely vulnerable to the impact of environmental degradation, including climate change. These are two good reasons, one might assume, for prioritising the environment in development efforts. Yet the continent has a woefully inadequate structure for the governance of the environment.”

Read more on https://theconversation.com/how-africa-can-up-its-game-to-meet-environmental-challenges-54204

EU-Africa Workshop

EU-Africa Workshop, June 6, 2015, GovInn, University of Pretoria

EU-Africa Workshop, June 6, 2015, GovInn, University of Pretoria

The EU-Africa workshop was the first event held under the auspices of the new European Studies Association of Sub-Saharan Africa (ESA-SSA). It took place in front of a standing room only audience on June 5, 2015 at the University of Pretoria during Governance Innovation Week. A diverse range of African, European and North American scholars and practitioners assembled for an exchange of views about the evolving relationship between Africa and the European Union. The overall theme was about innovation, with particular focus was on updating the debate, challenging some of the old donor and client characterisations, and better reflecting the changing conditions in Africa and Europe. Honorary Director at the European Commission, Philippe Darmuzey, kicked off the discussions with an opening speech on new directions in EU-Africa security and development cooperation. Panels followed with focus on innovation, trade and resources, and South Africa’s place in EU-Africa relations. Renown scholars such as Gilbert Khadiagala (Witswatersrand) explored the African Union’s approach to multilateral relations with the EU, while Daniel Bach (Bordeaux) examined innovative policies in emerging economies. Practitioners such as EU Ambassador Roeland Van De Geer touched on the EU-South Africa relationship while Andrew Sherriff (ECDPM) explored the EU’s changing institutions and their consequences for relations with Africa. The workshop was universally deemed a success and a strong beginning for new collaboration and research in EU-Africa relations.

Justice on the margins

Project Summary: This comparative research project examines justice outside of the formal state systems, on the borders between countries and during transitions in Africa. In the past few decades, increasing amounts of attention and resources have been given to national reconciliation and transitional justice, as is evident in the increased inclusion of these in mediation processes and peace agreements. There are long and difficult debates between local governments and the international community concerning what mechanisms should be adopted, as was evident in, for example, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Rwanda and more recently, the Democratic Republic of Conogo, Burundi and Zimbabwe. Yet, a lot of uncertainty remains about these processes and mechanisms, how they work and their actual contribution to peacebuilding.

This project straddles the Transboundary Governance, Security Governance and Governance of the Commons axes of GovInn and addresses three major challenges to reconciliation and transitional justice:

  • The lack of empirical research related to how particular national reconciliation and transitional justice mechanisms impact peacebuilding in local communities
  • The difficulty of balancing adherence to ‘international norms’ with the needs of local governments and communities
  • The fact that many conflicts occur across borders whereas reconciliation and transitional justice is imagined only within the nation-state.
Ruth Murambadoro undertaking fieldwork in Zimbabwe

Ruth Murambadoro undertaking fieldwork in Zimbabwe

Project Team: Cori Wielenga, Chris Nshimbi, Ruth Murambadoro, Patrick Hajayandi

Junior researchers: Anthony Bizos, Chenai Matshaka, Rebeka Gluhbegovic, Zefanias Matsimbe

Funding: CODESRIA and the University of Pretoria’s Research Development Programme

Funding period: May 2015 – July 2019

Channel Africa SABC

Towards an African passport?

From Channel Africa, SABC

At the just ended 24th Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the African Union (AU Summit) held on 30-31 January 2015 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, under the theme: “Year of Women Empowerment and Development towards Africa’s Agenda 2063”, the Executive Council of AU deliberated on and requested the Commission to present detailed roadmaps for implementation of, among other flagship projects, The African Passport and Free Movement of People. GovInn Researcher and Co-Director, Chris Nshimbi, participated in panel discussion on the idea of an African passort on the African Dialogue program on SABC’sChannel Africa, 16 February 2015.

Call for abstracts: IGU 2015 Regional Conference, Moscow: “Regional integration in Southern Africa”

logo_classic_igumoscow17-21 August 2015, Lomonosov Moscow State University (LMSU)

In 1991, the African Union (AU) through the Treaty Establishing the African Economic Community (AEC) made a commitment towards integrating the African continent. In the AU’s integration agenda, the establishment of the AEC, is the ultimate expression and manifestation of the integration of the African continent. This integration is to be founded on eight regional economic communities (RECs) of which the Southern African Development Community (SADC) is one.

Ideally, successful integration in and of the respective RECs should translate into the success of the continental integration agenda. Africa on the other hand has in the past two decades experienced renewed growth, acquiring tags such as the rising sun. Therefore, this session proposes to discuss the challenges, prospects and opportunities that SADC has against its objective of an integrated southern Africa.

As one of the pillars of the proposed AEC, what are the economic, social, cultural and environmental challenges and trajectories of integration at the regional level in southern Africa?
For example, given the increasing levels of migration and the corresponding desire by some states to tighten cross border movement, is the idea of integration feasible, let alone sustainable?
Is a completely or partially integrated SADC region even possible?
What can SADC learn from the other regional economic communities on the African continent and other parts of the world?
What issues does the SADC region need to address in order to enhance integration?
How and does SADC relate with other RECs in Africa and outside in view of the continental integration agenda?
What can other RECs in Africa and other parts of the world learn from the SADC experience?
What can SADC learn from other regions?

SUBMISSION PROCEDURES:

Interested authors should register and submit abstracts (200-250 words) via the MOSCOW IGU Regional Conference website in the link provided below by selecting “Regional integration in Southern Africa: Changing socioeconomic balances in Africa and prospects for continental integration” under the “Session” drop down menu.

WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION: http://www.igu2015.ru/instruction-abstract-submission

DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING ABSTRACTS: 31 January 2015

NOTIFICATION OF THE RESULTS OF THE ABSTRACT REVIEW: 1 March 2015

Download the call for abstracts here

For further information please contact:

Dr. Christopher C. Nshimbi
Research Fellow
Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn)
Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria
Tel: +27 12 420 4152
Email: christopher.nshimbi@up.ac.za

Or

Mr. Inocent Moyo
Research Fellow
Department of Geography
UNISA, Florida Campus
Tel: +27 72 106 2632
Email: minnoxa@yahoo.com

The Will to Integrate: South Africa’s Responses to Regional Migration from the SADC Region

The African Development Review published a new paper by GovInn Chris Nshimbi and Lorenzo Fioramonti on how South Africa is responding to regional migration.

Abstract

This paper surveys frameworks of labour migration in southern Africa and determines South Africa’s policy responses to inflows of migrants from seven neighbouring countries. Legislations, policy reports and scientific publications on migration were thoroughly reviewed and interviews and correspondence with key policymakers were conducted. Statistical analyses of data on foreign worker recruitments and permits issued by South Africa’s Department of Home Affairs were also performed. The absence of a migration protocol in southern Africa suggests SADC Members have not implemented the African Union’s migration policy basic guidelines. Two systems coexist in southern Africa that complicate migration governance: a South Africa-managed bilateral migration policy, and aspirations for a formal SADC-managed migration policy. Bilateral agreements between South Africa and neighbours have established a labour migration system that dims prospects for a regional migration policy. SACU Members could establish a two-tier policy to achieve free movement while maintaining managed migration policy outside SACU. An official multilateral migration governance mechanism would serve SADC better than the current ad-hoc measures.

Read the full paper on the African Development Review