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“Zimbabwe is reaching a breaking point”, by Eric Manyonda and Ruth Murambadoro

by Eric Manyonda and Ruth Murambadoro, GovInn senior researcher

On the 24th of August 2016 the Zimbabwe Republic Police clashed with protesters over a planned demonstration led by a coalition of opposition parties and the civil society.

Since the birth of the citizens’ movement, #ThisFlag earlier this year, there has been an increase in sporadic outbursts of citizens demanding the government to deliver on its election promises. As such, the citizens who in spite of their political affiliations joined forces and launched a mega demonstration on the 24th of August through which they demanded the president Mr RG Mugabe to step down.
Initially the police had attempted to block the protest by rejecting the clearance application that had been made by the protesting parties in accordance with the Public Order and Security Act (POSA). According to the POSA, any groups of people intending on holding a meeting are required to notify the police of the event and get permission. This according to the Act, is done to protect and prevent the gatherings from turning violent. Upon notice of the ‘Mega demo’ the police rejected the application citing lack of manpower to monitor the event. Opposition parties however sought the intervention of the high court, which acted in their favour by overturning the decision of the police. Armed with the high court ruling the opposition parties went ahead with their planned demonstration and launched the Mugabe Must Go Now campaign.

Zimbabwe Unrest 2016

To their dismay, the peaceful protestors were caught up in the crossfire as police had been deployed heavily armed to attack and disrupt the protest. The innocent protestors were forced to run for their lives while the police fired water cannons, teargas and even button sticks to disperse the crowds. The dire situation also agitated some already desperate protestors who retaliated to the police attacks by torching police vehicles, looting and launching attacks on businesses in the city, thereby escalating the violence to unprecedented levels. By Friday the violence had intensified pushing the government to increase the police force and even deployed the military, a phenomenon that last occurred in Zimbabwe during the food riots of 1998.

Though a state of emergency has not yet been declared, the military is now guarding the capital city Harare and some parts of the country are under heavy security surveillance. It appears as if Zimbabwe has reached its breaking point and the government is desperately trying to prevent the Arab Spring phenomenon.

All pictures by Eric Manyonda

Launch of the “Economic Report on Africa (ERA) 2016” by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), 24 June 2016

govinn UN NAS

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the Postgraduate School of Agriculture and Rural Development invite you to the Launch of the 

“Economic Report on Africa (ERA) 2016” 

by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA)

Date: Friday, 24 June 2016
Time: 12:00 – 14:00
Venue: Room L1-70 Graduate Centre, University of Pretoria Main Campus (Hatfield)
RSVP essential: http://goo.gl/forms/jhMyy6gkH5hzyMRD2 by 22 June 2016
Queries: thinah.moyo@up.ac.za

African economies face risks that require special attention from policy-makers, including turbulence in the global economy. Africa’s vulnerability calls for a rethink of its broader development strategy. Despite robust economic growth in Africa (often higher than elsewhere in the world over the last decade), it has rarely been inclusive, the number of Africans in absolute poverty has risen and inequality remains a major issue. And because Africa’s growth has been largely tied to exploiting non-renewable natural resources—with minimal value added and employment generation—sustainable growth has been undermined.

These three strands—macroeconomic vulnerability, social inequality and natural resource dominance—weave into the argument that industrialization is critical for Africa’s structural transformation and efforts to create jobs, raise value added and increase incomes. Current developing-country models of economic growth, as exemplified by China and India, rarely account for the social and environmental externalities that exacerbate poverty in developing countries, Africa included. Given the commodity domination of its exports, its drive for industrialization and structural transformation, and its greater energy needs, Africa’s imperative is to adopt
green growth.

The report examines how greening the industrialization process can serve as an instrument of accelerated industrialization and structural transformation in Africa. A green economy is considered to improve human well-being and social equity, while sharply curtailing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. It integrates economic, social and environmental policies and focuses on new opportunities for economic growth that reduce pressure on the quality and quantity of natural capital systems. A green growth pathway will put Africa’s development on a more robust and sustainable foundation, since it not only accommodates growth of the economy but also prioritizes the need for restoring or increasing environmental and social assets.

‘Brexit opportunity for Britain to find the courage to change’, Business Day 27.05.2016

Screen Shot 2016-05-27 at 8.39.12 AM

In his latest op-ed for BDLive GovInn director Lorenzo Fioramonti discusses the upcoming Brexit vote and considers Great Britain’s often difficult relationship with the European Union. The article asks what “Britain can do for Europe?” in contrast to the traditional narrative of “what can Europe do for Great Britain?” and points out the Brexit vote is an opportunity to for British people to rethink their own governance as well as their relationship with Africa. to read the full article follow the link here.

 

“Education: fundamental to a countries future”

The University of Pretoria is proud to host a joint initiative by the European Commission and the United Nations Development Programme in the form of the Kapuscinski Development Lecture 2016.

Prof Norman Duncan, Vice-Principal (Academic), cordially invites you to attend the Kapuscinski Development Lecture on the theme: Education: fundamental to a country’s future. The focus will be on education and employability and how this is fundamental to all aspects of a country’s development.

Top global thinkers use this platform to discuss development. Since 2009, more than 80 lectures have been held at partner universities and think tanks reaching over 25 000 people.

Date: Tuesday 31 May 2016
Time: 18:00

Cocktail after the lecture 19:30-20:30

Venue: Senate Hall, Hatfeld Campus, Lynnwood Road, Pretoria

GPS: S25° 45’ 21” E28° 13’ 51”

Dress: Day Wear

Enquiries: Neo Maseko, 012 420 2631

RSVP: here by 27 May 2016

 

 

The eventswas co-hosted by SIWI, GovInn and the WRC

Watch GovInn associate fellow Quraysha Ismail Sooliman’s interview with Dr Rajendra Singh

Rajenda Singh and Lorenzo Fioramonti

Rajenda Singh and Lorenzo Fioramonti

Famed water conservationist and activist Dr Rajendra Singh, known as the “water man of India”, sat down with GovInn associate fellow Quraysha Ismail Sooliman proir to his presentation at the GovInn rethinking development seminar, “The power of Community: Water security in times of scarcity”. They discuss the conservation methods employed in his native Rajasthan, sustainable solutions to water management and the policies that should accompany such initiatives. To watch follow the link here

DICKSON AJISAFE

Associate Fellow

Bio

As a researcher, Dickson Ajisafe is passionate about sustainable peace, international security, transnational terrorism, radicalisation, violent extremism and human development in Africa, Europe, Middle-East and other hemispheres. He is a PhD candidate, specialising in International Relations at the Department of Political Sciences, University of Pretoria. He possesses a Master degree in African and European Cultural Relations at the University of Pretoria, a year Master studies in Politics and Public Administration at Konstanz University, Germany and a Master degree in International Relations from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife, Nigeria.
Dickson has participated in international seminars, workshops, professional training and academic discussions in Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda, Switzerland, Germany, Italy, Austria, Belgium, France, and Hungary. He is a recipient of international scholarships, training and professional awards from South Africa, the USA, the UK, Belgium, Germany, Russia and Norway. His story of accomplishment has been featured by the European Commission in ESAA magazine, Pretoria News, GovInn Webpage and UP WebNews. Dickson is skilled in research, capacity building, training, human development, project and programme management.

 

Contact him at dickson.ajisafe@esaa-eu.org

 

Network of Wellbeing

Wellbeing & GDP

Lorenzo Fioramonti, director of the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation, gave a lecture on wellbeing & GDP in Totnes, UK, to the Network of Wellbeing.

 

The eventswas co-hosted by SIWI, GovInn and the WRC

Rethinking Development Seminar: ‘The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity’

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation hosted the Rethinking Development seminar titled ‘The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity’, together with the Stockholm International Water Institute and the Water Research Commission. Mr. Rajendra Singh, The Water Man of India, presented his work on community-led initiatives to conserve water:

Rajendra Singh is a well-known water conservationist. Also known as “Water Man of India”, he won the Stockholm Water Prize in 2015. Previously, he won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for community leadership in 2001 for his pioneering work in community-based efforts in water harvesting and water management. He has been instrumental in fighting slow bureaucracy and  mining lobbies and has helped villagers take charge of water management in their semi-arid areas through the use of ‘johad’, rainwater storage tanks, check dams and other time-tested as well as path-breaking techniques. He is one of the members of the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) under the Indian Ministry of the Environment. In 2008, The Guardian named him as one of the “50 people who could save the planet”.

Please find the pictures taken at this seminar below.

 

New Rules for Global Justice: Structural Redistribution in the Global Economy

New-Rules-for-Global-Justice-1

Published by Rowman & Littefield GovInn Director Prof. Lorenzo Fioramonit’s new book will be launched at ISA in April in Atlanta, Georgia. Co edited by Jan Aart Scholte, faculty Professor in Peace and Development in the school of Global Studies at the University of Gothenburg and Alfred Nhema, Chief Executive Officer at the Pan African Development Center the book explores global equality and distribution in relation to states, class, gender and race using examples drawn from nations like Zimbabwe and Australia. It presents proposals to mitigate public discontent with global inequality via “new rules” which can overcome issues of finance, food security, migration, climate change and corruption.

 

“The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity

Invitation-5 (2)

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and SIWI invite you to a Rethinking Development Seminar

“The power of community: Water security in times of scarcity”

Presented by Rajendra Singh, The Water Man of India

Rajendra Singh is a well-known water conservationist. Also known as “Water Man of India”, he won the Stockholm Water Prize in 2015. Previously, he won the Ramon Magsaysay Award for community leadership in 2001 for his pioneering work in community-based efforts in water harvesting and water management. He has been instrumental in fighting slow bureaucracy and  mining lobbies and has helped villagers take charge of water management in their semi-arid areas through the use of ‘johad’, rainwater storage tanks, check dams and other time-tested as well as path-breaking techniques. He is one of the members of the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) under the Indian Ministry of the Environment. In 2008, The Guardian named him as one of the “50 people who could save the planet”.

Date: Thursday 3 March 2016
Time: 14:00-16:00 PM
Venue: GovInn Headquarters, Old College House, University of Pretoria Main Campus (Hatfield)

RSVP essential: Contact Neil Kasselman neil.kasselman@governanceinnovation.org by 29 February 2016.