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Neil Kasselman

CIDOB Conference

Reconfiguration of the Global South – Frank Mattheis participates in the annual CIDOB/OCP Policy Centre conference

CIDOB Conference

Panel discussion at the CIDOB/OCP Policy Centre annual conference on reconfigurations of the Global South (photo by CIDOB)

On 28 and 29 January 2016, the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs (CIDOB) and the OCP Policy Centre convened their annual conference in the city of Barcelona. This year’s edition was hosted by CIDOB  senior researcher Eckart Woertz. The theme addressed the reconfiguration of the Global South stemming from the economic and political rise of Asian powers. Thirty international researchers focused on how African and Latin America position themselves in this context and discussed questions ranging from food security to new institutions of global governance.

GovInn senior researcher Frank Mattheis and his collaborator Christina Stolte (FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg) presented results from their analysis of Brazil’s development assistance to Africa, in particular its agricultural cooperation with Ghana. The results of the conference will be disseminated in two publications to come out in 2016: a special issue in Spanish with Afers Internacionals, and an edited volume in English with Routledge.

Lorenzo Fioramonti speaking in Austria about political alternatives to a GDP-focused world

VIDEO: Beyond GDP and political alternatives

Watch GovInn Director Lorenzo Fioramonti speaking about political alternatives to a GDP-focused world at an event hosted by Impulszentrum Zukunftsfähiges Wirtschaften on 9 October 2015, in Graz, Austria.

Say goodbye to capitalism: Welcome to the Republic of Wellbeing, The Guardian 02.09.2015

New Zealand’s Whanganui River

In 2012, New Zealand’s Whanganui River became a legal entity with a legal voice.

GovInn Director Lorenzo Fioramonti and his colleagues in the Alliance for Sustainability and Prosperity have co-authored an article for The Guardian on their vision of a global governance transformation that will create governments committed to pursuing the Sustainable Development Goals of the post 2015 agenda.

 

Authored by: Lorenzo Fioramonti, Enrico Giovannini, Robert Constanza, Ida Kubiszewski, Kate Pickett, Kristin Vala Ragnarsdottir, Roberto de Vogli and Richard Wilkinson

Imagine a country genuinely committed to pursuing the sustainable development goals (SDGs), set to be agreed on by the international community later this month. It would place emphasis on human and ecosystem wellbeing as the ultimate objective of progress. This country – let’s call it the Republic of Wellbeing – and its business sector would need to embark on a profound transformation to achieve durable, long-term change.

Around the world today, companies and governments do precisely the opposite: they put more emphasis on short-term economic dynamics, or what Hillary Clinton criticised as “quarterly capitalism”. If we are serious about meeting the SDGs then this cannot continue.

Read the full article at The Guardian.

 

Jules and Raphael with the seminar guests.

“The Circular Economy… In Africa” by Jules Coignard and Raphael Masvigner

On the sixth leg of their round the world tour, Jules Coignard and Raphael Masvigner shared their findings so far on circular economic models or “closed loop” systems. Their vision is to educate people on the transitions that take place from the linear to the circular model, and the relevance that the circular economic principles have across all disciplines and in all sectors. The French economist can be followed on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram under the company Circul-R or visit their website as they continue their 22 country, 17 month tour.

Jules and Raphael with the seminar guests.

Jules and Raphael with the seminar guests.

Jules Coignard discussing the circular economy.

Jules Coignard discussing the circular economy.

Population growth and regional development: African Economic Outlook 2015, coordinated by CIRAD

rapport-2015-perspectives-economiques-en-afrique_lightboxWith a population set to more than double by 2050 to over two billion inhabitants, half of whom will be under 25, Africa is facing unprecedented structural challenges. Population growth is an opportunity for economic growth, but it will undoubtedly upset regional equilibria. Those upsets will mean making in-depth changes to the approaches taken as regards development policy. This is what emerges from the 2015 edition of the African Economic Outlook, in which several CIRAD researchers participated, which was published recently.

The report contains thematic chapters whose topic varies each year. It is regional development that is the topic for the 2015 edition, of which CIRAD was scientific coordinator.

According to the Report, the African continent is predicted to receive a “demographic dividend” and to benefit for a few decades from a greater number of workers than of unemployed. This situation will free up potential to save, invest and boost incomes.

However, the report also contains a warning: it will be necessary to change the perspective of development policies, or else this “demographic dividend” will be lost and there will be a significant risk of a hitherto unseen rise in poverty and risks of conflict. This gift of more inhabitants and workers is an asset for the continent, on one condition: that the subsequent growth is inclusive and creates jobs.

Read the full presentation on CIRAD’s website

 Access the full report here

Rethinking Development Seminar: Working with the grain by Brian Levy

Working with the grain

Book Launch: Working with the grain – integrating governance and growth in development strategies’  by Prof. Brian Levy

The Rethinking Development Seminar Series is a joint initiative of the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation, the Human Economy Programme and the Postgraduate School of Agriculture and Rural Development.

About the book:  Good governance has failed as a prescription for addressing development challenges. This book proposes an innovative ‘with-the-grain’ alternative as a constructive, hopeful way of engaging the challenging governance ambiguities of our early 21st century world.

About the author: Brian Levy is currently involved in the faculties of the School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Cape Town.
He has a sustained track record of both thought leadership and hands-on experience. At theWorld Bank, where he worked for more than two decades, he led the programme to increase support for public-sector reform in Africa, and subsequently co-led the effort to mainstream governance and anti-corruption into the organisation’s operational programmes.
Prof. Levy has published widely on the interactions between institutions, political economy and development policy.
He obtained his PhD in Economics from Harvard University in 1983.

Date: 21 July 2015
Time: 12:30-14:00
Venue: Graduate Centre L1-72, University of Pretoria, Hatfield Campus

Building regions from below: Informal cross-border trade and regional integration in the COMESA-EAC-SADC Tripartite (AFRTJ)

The 15 member-state Southern African Development Community (SADC) started out in April 1980 as the Southern African Development Co-ordinating Conference (SADCC) and changed into SADC in August 1992. SADC aims at integrated regional development through formal regional institutions and seeks an economic union through the successive stages of regional integration as espoused by economic theory. This has consequences for the movement of factors of production in the region including labour, capital, goods and services. This research investigates the activities of informal cross-border traders and migrants in the COMESA-EAC-SADC Tripartite in general and the SADC region in particular, with a view to understanding the contribution of such actors to the integration of the said regions. Informal (ethnic) entrepreneurs, local non-state actors, relevant officials from local, provincial and national government in the target areas and relevant officials from, among others, SADC, COMESA, EAC inform the research through interviews. The research gives special attention to persons living in towns, areas, etc. that are proximate to the borders of the countries that form part of the sample for the study. The research also relies on various theories and approaches, such as sociological exchange theory and international political economy approach, and presents historical, socioeconomic, and political accounts observable in the study target areas and populations.

Duration: 2014-2019
Funding: National Research Foundation/Department of Science and Technology (RSA)
chris_field1

GovInn deputy director Chris Nhsimbi conducting research on cross-border trade

Gross Domestic Problem on Italian TV

Lorenzo Fioramonti, GovInn director, interviewed by Sky TV in Italy on his film Gross Domestic Fraud (Presi per il PIL), which won the 2015 edition of the French film Festival de Recherche et Development Durable in Toulouse

Thinah Moyo