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Prof. Roberto D'Alimonte

Professor Roberto D’Alimonte visit to GovInn

The first two weeks of June saw GovInn hosting Prof. Roberto D’Alimonte from Luiss University in Rome. During his time at GovInn, Prof. D’Alimonte presented three seminars:

  • “What is wrong with the Euro?” on 4 August 2015 at the Old College House.
  • “Macho Politics: Power, conflict and scandal in the age of Berlusconi and Zuma” on 12 August 2015 at the Old College House, co-presented with Prince Mashele.
  • “Electoral systems and democratic accountability: a critical analysis with lessons for South Africa” on 14 August 2015.

The events were both successful and well attended, with a wide range of seminar guests from local municipalities, embassies to students and University of Pretoria staff. These seminars were well received, with Prof. D’Alimonte not just showing his knowledge of Italy, but providing lessons for South Africa. Prof. D’Alimonte based this on his own accumulated knowledge and on a seminar he co-presented with Prince Mashele on 12 August.

GovInn looks forward to extending this partnership with Prof. D’Alimonte and Luiss University.

 

"Africa should avoid copying Europe’s failing experiment" Business Day 30.07.2015

“Africa should avoid copying Europe’s failing experiment” Business Day 30.07.2015

"Africa should avoid copying Europe’s failing experiment" Business Day 30.07.2015GovInn Director Lorenzo Fioramonti discusses the EU crisis from an African point of view: is the EU really the right model of regional integration?

“THE European Union (EU) is generally presented as the most advanced case of regional integration in the world. It has progressed from a system of sectoral co-operation in energy governance among six states in the early 1950s to a multifaceted body of 28 members, with unprecedented powers in areas such as economic and social development, monetary governance, legal affairs and foreign policy.

Its approach to integration has been driven by bureaucratic and economic elites, mostly through technical co-operation among key national departments. There is little doubt that such a top-down approach was a key strength during the takeoff phase of integration, as technocrats managed to forge co-operative mechanisms despite the volatility of politics and the fierce ideological battles of the time. Citizens’ involvement came late, with the first parliamentary elections only in 1979. Albeit marginally on the increase, genuine popular participation in Europe’s affairs has been deliberately kept at bay by its architects. Over time, this has resulted in the populace endorsing a rather utilitarian approach towards the EU: happy to be part of it for as long as the benefits largely outweighed the costs.

Since the late 1990s, however, things have changed dramatically. A continent traditionally marked by progressive social policies, functioning welfare states and high living standards has been turned into a very unequal one, with shrinking budgets to support healthcare and education, but vast resources to subsidise financial markets.” […]

Read the full article on Business Day, 30.07.2015

Population growth and regional development: African Economic Outlook 2015, coordinated by CIRAD

rapport-2015-perspectives-economiques-en-afrique_lightboxWith a population set to more than double by 2050 to over two billion inhabitants, half of whom will be under 25, Africa is facing unprecedented structural challenges. Population growth is an opportunity for economic growth, but it will undoubtedly upset regional equilibria. Those upsets will mean making in-depth changes to the approaches taken as regards development policy. This is what emerges from the 2015 edition of the African Economic Outlook, in which several CIRAD researchers participated, which was published recently.

The report contains thematic chapters whose topic varies each year. It is regional development that is the topic for the 2015 edition, of which CIRAD was scientific coordinator.

According to the Report, the African continent is predicted to receive a “demographic dividend” and to benefit for a few decades from a greater number of workers than of unemployed. This situation will free up potential to save, invest and boost incomes.

However, the report also contains a warning: it will be necessary to change the perspective of development policies, or else this “demographic dividend” will be lost and there will be a significant risk of a hitherto unseen rise in poverty and risks of conflict. This gift of more inhabitants and workers is an asset for the continent, on one condition: that the subsequent growth is inclusive and creates jobs.

Read the full presentation on CIRAD’s website

 Access the full report here

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External perceptions of the EU research group

Workshop on the external perceptions of the European Union

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GovInn’s director Professor Lorenzo Fioramonti and junior researcher Kirsty Agnew participated in a three day workshop in Brussels as part of an ongoing project on the external perceptions of the European Union (EU). The project is funded by the EU as part of their expanding public diplomacy initiatives. The project is coordinated by the National Centre for Research on Europe (NCRE) at the University of Canterbury, the NFG Research Group from the Freie Universitat Berlin and the Public Policy Management Institute (PPMI) located in Lithuania. Research is also being conducted by nine other research groups located in the EU’s strategic partner nations around the world. Prof. Fioramonti and Kirsty are conducting research into South Africa’s perception of the EU with an aim to provide innovative growth to the relationship between EU governance structures and South Africa. The workshop in Brussels was to present data from the first stage of the research process.

Linking up Africa to European Union

In this article for The New Age political commentator and former SA diplomat Tom Wheeler report on his participation to the launch of ESA-SSA (European Studies Association of Sub-Saharan Africa), during GovInn Week 2015.

“It was pointed out that unlike Europe and America, where there are many university departments of African studies, there are few if any of such institutions for European Studies in Africa. The result is often that Europe is dealt in Africa in terms of political rhetoric”

ESA-SSA-workshop-New-Age-Tom-Wheeler-1

 

Workshop on the EU’s External Environmental Policy

A three-day workshop on the EU’s external environmental policy was held at the University of Pretoria on 2-4 June as part of the GovInn Week 2015.

The EU has long been reported to be a global environmental leader and is party to the major international environmental treaties. However, apart from multi-lateral negotiations, the EU seeks to extend it environmental norms, rules and polices beyond its legal jurisdiction through a surprisingly large array of instruments, including: bilateral trade agreements, strategic partnerships, transnational policy networks, and development cooperation.

This workshop brought together a small group of top international scholars from around the world to explore how, where and to what effect the EU is embarking on new forms of external environmental governance.

 

 

The workshop programme is below:

Programme: The External Dimension of the European Union’s Environmental policy
2-4 June 2015, Graduate Centre,University of Pretoria, South Africa
Monday 1 June Arrival of international participants
Tuesday 2 June: Day One
08:30 – 09.00  Coffee and registration
Session 1
09:00 – 10:45 Opening remarks: Camilla Adelle, GovInn, University of Pretoria (South Africa)
“The external dimension of EU climate and energy policy”
John Vogler, Keele University (UK)
“The EU in international environmental negotiations” Tom Delreux, Institut de Sciences Politiques Louvain (UC Louvain)Read the policy brief adapted from Professor Delreux’s conference paper here.
Chair: Camilla Adelle, GovInn, University of Pretoria (South Africa)
10.45 – 11.15                 Coffee break
Session 2
11.15 – 13.00 The EU’s external governance tool box
“The European External Action Service”Diarmuid Torney, Dublin City University (Ireland) Read the policy brief adapter from Dr Torney’s conference paper here.
“EU climate diplomacy and the challenge of norm entrepreneurship”
Mai’a Davis Cross, Northeastern University (US)
Chair:  Navraj Singh Ghaleigh, University of Edinburgh (UK)
13.00 – 14.00                  Lunch
Session 3
14.00 – 15.45 The EU’s external governance tool box
“Can environmental standards in trade agreements be effective instruments of EU external environmental governance?” Evgeny Postnikov, University of Glasgow (UK) Read the policy brief adapted by Dr Postnikov’s from his conference paper here.
“Market-based instruments to support climate change objectives: Encouraging action on carbon taxes and emissions trading beyond Europe”, Sirini Withana, Konar Mutafoglu and Patrick ten Brink, Institute for European Environmental Policy (Belgium and UK)
“The Salience of EU Climate Law: Inspiration, Diplomacy by Law and ‘Learning by Doing’ in East Asia” Navraj Singh Ghaleigh, University of Edinburgh (UK)
Chair:  Mai’a Davis Cross, Northeastern University, US
15.45 – 16.30                Break
16.30 – 18.30 GovInn Week Keynote lecture: UP Conference Centre

“Poverty with added vitamins? Competing ways to govern the world food system”
Raj Patel, New York Times bestselling author of Stuffed and Starved and The Value of Nothing. Books available for sale.


18.30                             Reception: UP Conference Centre  
                                     (buses back to guest house)

 

08:30 – 09.00                  Coffee
Session 1
9.00 – 10.45 Country perspectives
“Making sense of the EU’s external climate change governance towards its southern neighbours”
Angelos Katsaris, College of Europe (Poland)“Integrating public participation into China’s environmental governance: The EU’s external influence”
Wen Xiang, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)
Chair: Tom Delreux, Institut de Sciences Politiques Louvain (UC Louvain)
10.45 – 11.15     Coffee Break
Session 2
11.15 – 13.00 Country perspectives
“The EU’s role in natural resource use in Africa” Oladiran Bello, South African Institute of International Affairs (South Africa)
“Contributions of the EU to the Construction of Latin American Environmental Governance” Roberto Dominguez, Suffolk University, Boston (USA)Read the policy brief adapted from Professor Dominguez’s conference paper here.
Chair: Sarah Delputte, University of Ghent (Belgium)
13.00 – 14.00                  Lunch
Session 3
14.00 – 15.45 Future Challenges
“The limits of leadership in a cold economic climate: Whither the EU as an environmental normative power?” Charlotte Burns and Paul Tobin, University of York (UK)
“Closing discussion: next steps”
Chair: John Vogler, Keele University (UK)
15.45-16.30                              Break
16.30 – 18.30 GovInn Keynote lecture: UP Conference Centre

“Within or beyond capitalism? Four scenarios for the emerging collaborative economy”

Michel Bauwens, founder of the Peer-To-Peer Foundation and author of Network Society and Future Scenarios for a Collaborative Economy.
Books available for sale.


18.30 Reception

2013-2014 – The EU, Regional Conflicts and the Promotion of Regional Cooperation: A Successful Strategy for a Global Challenge? (REGIOCONF)

Regional conflicts are a core global challenge in that they threaten international peace and affect global actors either because of economic and strategic interests or because of challenges to normative claims. The European Union (EU) has been seen as a normative power able to help transform such conflicts.

A prominent strategy in this has been the promotion of regional integration through various forms of support for regional integration projects and strategies, from the Andean Community to the African Union. REGIOCONF aims at assessing this strategy by comparing EU involvement in different cases in the Mediterranean, Africa, Central and South America and East Asia.
It will explain the persistence of this strategy and the choice of particular instruments, assess its implementation, analyse local responses and the interaction with the global community, and determine the conditions under which a regionalisation strategy, as an instrument of conflict transformation, may be successful.
In doing so, it will enhance our understanding of a crucial part of EU external policy, make a contribution to the debate about sustainable peace strategies, and put forward policy recommendations about how to assist the transformation of regional conflicts more successfully.

Partners:University of Tubingen (Germany), Istituto Affari Internazionali (Italy), University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), University of Algiers (Algeria), University of Tsukaba (Japan).

Funding: Volkswagen Foundation, Compagnia di San Paolo and Riksbankens Jubileumsfond.

GovInn researchers: 

2009-2012 – Mercury: Multilateralism and the EU in the Contemporary Global Order 


Multilateralism is defined in many ways, but common to all are the importance of rules, institutionalised cooperation and inclusiveness. Demand for multilateralism increases as new international challenges arise. Globalisation connects the world in ways both positive and negative. Trade, capital, ideas, people, technology, information, diseases and crime all flow more freely. Patterns of interaction between world regions are changing. New powers are rising. Alternative development paths and models of capitalism are being debated. International terrorist networks constitute a new and profound security challenge. New sources of conflict, over global warming, migration and resource scarcity, are emerging. MERCURY is a consortium of academic partners formed to examine critically the European Union’s contribution to multilateralism. It explores multilateralism as a concept, an aspiration, and a form of international order. 

Partners: University of Edinburgh (UK), Istituto Affari Internazionali (Italy), Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (Sweden), Charles University (Czech Republic), Fudan University (China), Sciences-Po (France), University of Cambridge (UK). 

Funding: European Union FP7 Programme.