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Call for Papers: Conceptual and Empirical Perspectives on the Performance of Regionalisms in the Global South: From State Fragility to Africa-EU relations, and beyond.

International Workshop

Conceptual and Empirical Perspectives on the Performance of Regionalisms in the Global South: From State Fragility to Africa-EU relations, and beyond.

2.-3. July 2020, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Germany

Call for Papers

 

ORGANISERS
Friedrich Plank – Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz
Contact: friedrich.plank@politik.uni-mainz.de

Johannes Muntschick – Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz
Contact: muntschick@uni-mainz.de

 

TOPIC
Research has increasingly acknowledged the rise and growing importance of regionalism and regional integration dynamics in the Global South. This reflects in a broad array of literature and a prolific research agenda focusing on comparative regionalism, overlapping regionalism, interregionalism including Africa-EU relations, or specific regional integration organisations (RIOs) and policy fields.

So far, the scientific debate on how to analyse and explain regionalism, specific regional integration processes and outcomes is yet significantly influenced by research on the European Union (EU). Theory-driven and systematic empirical studies on similar phenomena and observations beyond Europe are yet rare to find. This implies that research on regionalism in the Global South is often inherently Euro-centric.

Many shortcomings are specifically evident with reference to the performance of regionalism beyond the EU. While efforts have been made in analysing regionalism in the Global South across various policy fields ranging from mediation, to state fragility, to trade, and applying various different concepts, additional research is necessary with regard to the performance of RIOs and regional integration processes. Scholars have barely embarked on conceptualisations and theoretical frameworks to systematically analyse and explain the outcomes of regionalisms across various policy fields and regions, including hypotheses on the potential causal mechanisms at play and precise operationalisations of key concepts. Moreover, systematic empirical examinations and assessments on specific factors and conditions shaping the output and outcomes of regional integration projects are virtually non-existent. In addition, the performance of regionalisms in response to specific challenges such as state fragility and with reference to donor-recipient cooperation such as Africa-EU relations have so far barely been studied. In terms of theory, conceptualisations on the performance of regional organisations in the Global South are scarce, particularly because existing ones have been inspired primarily by looking at regional integration in Europe. Accordingly, many scholars have analysed the performance and effectiveness of the EU and provided for rich empirical findings and nuanced operationalisations, for instance in EU foreign policy. However, instead of simply applying these frameworks to regionalisms in the Global South, conceptualisations beyond European interpretations of performance are necessary since regional integration projects in structurally different environments might e.g. develop unique notions of performance, might be less focused on goals and their achievement, or confronted with diffuse challenges. These might evolve external dimensions of problem-solving, capacities and capabilities, alteration of behaviour, or social practices.

Possibly, the performance of regionalism is influenced by a variety of conditions. While intra-regional (f)actors such as regional hegemons, member states, non-governmental actors, or specific regional characteristics are widely recognised to play a pivotal role for the outcomes of regional organisations, there has been few systematic research on necessary and sufficient conditions affecting the performance of regional organisations. Such conditions might further involve e.g. cultural links within the regional organisation, institutional decision-making, donor recipient cooperation such as with the EU and African ROIs, the difficulty of the cooperation problem, or state fragility and institutional capacity.

 

OBJECTIVES
This international workshop seeks to bring together scholars and researchers who work on the topic of regionalism and aims to encourage and advance scientific research on the performance of RIOs and regional integration processes in the Global South. In this context, it aims to bring together research focusing on mediation, state fragility, donor-recipient relations in the context of regionalism, and other topics.

It seeks to provide for discussion and debates on the outcomes of regionalism in the Global South that move beyond European notions and European actors, and are inclusive with regard to actors or policy fields. In particular, the workshop seeks to embark on conceptualising RIO performance and its conditions by including existing frameworks to some extent but concurrently debating and developing new and innovative approaches. It aims at analysing and explaining the outcomes of regionalisms in comparative perspective – with a focus on the Global South. This shall lead to achieving systematic and profound empirical knowledge on the similarities and differences among regional organisations as well as understanding how specific conditions and (f)actors unfold influence. Methodologically, the workshop seeks to combine varying approaches to the study of regionalism including – but not limited to – quantitative analyses, single case studies, comparative endeavours, or other empirical approaches.

Successful papers address topics and questions such as:

  • How can we systematically evaluate/assess the performance of regional organisations in the Global South?
  • What conditions and factors affect the performance of regional organisations in the Global South?
  • In what ways do intra- and/or extra-regional (f)actors shape the performance of regional organisations in the Global South?
  • How do intra- and/or extra-regional non-governmental (f)actors such as member states, the EU,or international partners/donors shape the performance of regional organisations in the Global South?
  • How do factors specific to the region such as state fragility shape the performance of regional organisations in the Global South?
  • How do regional organisations perform in mediation efforts, also in cooperation with external actors such as the EU?
  • How does the architecture of regional organisations shape their performance?
  • What are the similarities and/or differences of regional organisations’ performance in the Global South and what explains them?
  • How do regional organisations in the Global South perform across various policy fields?
  • The combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods with the goal of better analysing, explaining, and understanding regionalism in comparative perspective.

Papers should provide for a (theory-informed) conceptualisation of performance and embark on an empirical approach. Analyses on regionalisms in Africa, Asia, and South America are most welcome. The conference is planned to lead to a joint publication (edited volume with an international publishing house) in which high-quality papers may become part of. In preparation of the workshop, the organisers will provide for an introductory paper that outlines conceptual and methodological approaches to the study of performance of regional organisations in the Global South.

  • Please send an abstract of your paper proposal (max. 300 words; please include title, name and affiliation) by 29th March 2020 (deadline) to: regionalism@uni-mainz.de
  • Limited funding will be available to finance (part) of the travel and accommodation costs. Please, state whether your participation will depend on funding made available by the organisers. If desired, the organisers will take efforts to provide for childcare.

 

Official Call Document.

‘Pan-African Aspirations Drive a New Free Trade Pact’ by Chris Nshimbi in Current History.

GovInn’s Director Chris Nshimbi published the article ‘Pan-African Aspirations Drive a New Free Trade Pact‘ in Current History.

Transnational labor mobility will be integral to the continental free trade area. Some services that are going to
be traded across nation-state borders will require people to go along with them. Ideally, the free movement of goods and services should coexist with the free movement of people.

Read the whole article here: http://www.currenthistory.com.uplib.idm.oclc.org

‘Southern African countries won’t manage disasters unless they work together’, by Chris Nshimbi in The Conversation.

GovInn’s Director Chris Nshimbi recently published the article ‘Southern African countries won’t manage disasters unless they work together‘ in The Conversation.

But, natural disasters like Idai doesn’t respect national boundaries. Their very regional scope requires solutions that integrate domestic actions into a regional governance framework to address them effectively … Instead of acting individually, SADC countries need to work together to pool resources and mobilise disaster relief efforts and resources to be more effective. This could be done through the SADC Secretariat.

 

Read the whole article here: https://theconversation.com/southern-african-countries-wont-manage-disasters-unless-they-work-together-114541

Invitation: “Fringe Regionalism – When Peripheries Become Regions” 27 February 2019

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the Department of Political Sciences are delighted to invite you to a conversation on Fringe Regionalism – When Peripheries Become Regions. The conversation will be facilitated by the author and GovInn research fellow Dr Frank Matthies.  

Date: Wednesday, 27 February 2019

Time: 13:00 – 14:00

Venue: Old College House Room 1-09, University of Pretoria

Queries: kirsty.agnew@up.ac.za

27-February-2019_Frank-Mattheis-Book-Launch

BOOK ‘Interregionalism across the Atlantic Space’, eds by Frank Mattheis and Andréas Godsäter

GovInn’s Senior Researcher  Frank Mattheis and Associate Fellow Andréas Godsäter published the book ‘Interregionalism across the Atlantic Space‘ in the United Nations University Series on Regionalism at Springer.

This book focuses on interregional relations across the Atlantic and the possible evolution of a new, distinctive Atlantic space for international relations. It provides a comprehensive insight into the overlapping linkages of interregionalism in the wider Atlantic space. Additionally, it raises the question of relevance, currently the main question in this field of research: Is interregionalism important because it brings about something new that really matters or is it simply a (perhaps unavoidable) by-product of regionalism? The book conducts an analysis of six interregional relations criss-crossing the Atlantic space, accounting for the multitude of interregional connections within a potential Atlantic macro region and analysing the differences, conflicts and convergences between regional organizations. It engages with the issue of agency in interregional relations, and argues that interregional processes and agendas are always driven and constructed by certain actors for certain purposes.

Read the full book here: http://www.springer.com/gb/book/9783319629070

 

Book review ‘Region-building in Africa: Political and economic challenges’, by Frank Mattheis, 14.08.2017

GovInn’s Senior Researcher Frank Mattheis published the book review ‘Region-building in Africa: Political and economic challenges‘, edited by Daniel H. Levine and Dawn Nagar, in the South African Journal of International Affairs.

Since its political independence, Africa has been rife with projects to achieve regional and continental integration. Every decade has seen dozens of new regional acronyms being created, from specialised agencies to all-encompassing institutions. The question as to what this plethora of organisations has achieved is thus as relevant as ever, and Levine and Nagar have attempted to address it with the edited volume Region-building in Africa: Political and economic challenges. The book is substantial and constitutes a relevant reference point for the pan-African intel ligentsia dealing with regionalism. Nineteen renowned authors provide contributions although, from the outset, it is striking that most are not based in Africa and only four are women (two of them providing chapters on non-African regions).

Read the full review here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10220461.2017.1361862

Repositioning Europe in the study of regions: comparative regionalism, interregionalism and decentred regionalism by Frank Mattheis

GovInn’s Senior Researcher Frank Mattheis published the article ‘Repositioning Europe in the study of regions: comparative regionalism, interregionalism and decentred regionalism‘ in the Journal of European Integration.

The constitution of European Union (EU) studies has long been an exclusionary process, both dealing extensively with internal debates and arguing for an own discipline within or even next to political sciences and international relations. Due to the self-centredness on the vivid development of the EU, other regions were largely disregarded when it came to theory building or only taken into account later as comparators.

 

Read the full article here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07036337.2017.1317985

Book discussion: “The New Politics of Regionalism” and “Post Western World”

On Friday, 3 February the Center for the Study of Governance Innovation hosted roundtable discussion to promote two recently released books, one edited volume by GovInn’s Dr Frank Mattheis and the other by visiting scholar Dr Oliver Stuenkel, Associate Professor of International Relations at the Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV) in São Paulo. The discussion was moderated by University of Pretoria Department of Political Sciences lecturer Ms Sithembile Mbete and received presentations by Dr Mattheis on his edited volume, “The New Politics of Regionalism: Perspectives from Africa, Latin America and Asia-Pacific” (Routledge) and Dr Stuenkel on his book, “Post Western World” (Polity) before engaging with guests in an open table discussion.

 

 

 

Book Discussion: “The Rise of New Powers in Global and Regional Politics?”

The Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) and the Department of Political Sciences at the University of Pretoria invite you to join us on Friday 3 February for a discussion on the changing landscape of international relations with Professor Oliver Stuenkel (Getulio Vargas Foundation) and Dr Frank Mattheis (GovInn) who have both recently released books on the topic. The session will be moderated by Department of Political Sciences lecturer Sithembile Mbete.

In this provocative book Post-Western World: How Emerging Powers Are Remaking Global Order (Polity, 2016), Oliver Stuenkel argues that our understanding of global order and predictions about its future are limited because we seek to imagine the post-Western world from a parochial Western-centric perspective. Such a view is increasingly inadequate in a world where billions of people regard Western rule as a temporary aberration, and the rise of Asia as a return to normalcy.

The volume The New Politics of Regionalism. Perspectives from Africa, Latin America and Asia-Pacific (Routledge, 2017), edited by Ulf Engel, Heidrun Zinecker, Frank Mattheis, Antje Dietze and Thomas Plötze, brings together innovative contributions that focus on the role of regional actors and the making and interplay of regionalisms in the processes of reshaping social spaces within an evolving global order. Analysing these new regionalisms from the perspective of the Global South, the contributions in the volume departs from state-centred perspectives and focusing on the transformations and constructions of regionalisms across varying spatial dimensions.

 

Oliver Stuenkel is an Associate Professor of International Relations at the Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV) in São Paulo.

Frank Mattheis is a Senior Researcher at the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn) at the University of Pretoria.

Sithembile Mbete is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Sciences at the University of Pretoria.

 

Date: Friday, 3 February 2017

Time: 14h00 – 16h00

Venue: GovInn Headquarters, Old College House, University of Pretoria Main Campus (Hatfield)

RSVP: https://goo.gl/forms/jDSDyqOAI4pXObv63

Queries: info@governanceinnovation.org

 

More information on these books:

http://www.postwesternworld.com/2016/04/30/western-available-amazon/

https://www.routledge.com/p/book/9781138200883

 

Book-discussion-invite-A-Changing-Global-Order-–-Perspectives-from-the-South-FINAL.docx

The New Politics of Regionalism

Book Cover

Book Cover: The New Politics of Regionalism

On 14 December, GovInn senior researcher Frank Mattheis will participate in the launch of the book “The New Politics of Regionalisms” at the Centre for Area Studies at the University of Leipzig (Germany). He co-edited book, which was published in October 2016 by Routledge, with Ulf Engel, Heidrun Zinecker, Antje Dietze and Thomas Plötze, and contributed to several chapters in the volume. Jon Schubert, postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Leipzig, will act as discussant for the evening.

Since the end of the Cold War, different forms of territorialization have emerged and we are confronted with an increasing number and variety of actors that are establishing regional projects. How can the study of the emergence and transformation of regionalisms and of different forms of territorialization aid in understanding the dynamics of this post-Cold War world order? This edited volume brings together innovative contributions to the study of this new complexity. It focuses on the role of regional actors, and the making and interplay of regionalisms in the processes of reshaping social spaces within an evolving global order. Analysing these new regionalisms from the perspective of the Global South, the contributions in the volume highlight the struggles that take place between a variety of actors, departing from state-centred perspectives and focusing on the transformations and constructions of regionalisms across varying spatial dimensions.

Organized into three sections, the volume attempts to identify the specific conditions and junctures of different forms of region-making in their external (global) and internal (local /national) dimensions. The volume also places special emphasis on interactions, spatial entanglements and comparisons between regionalisms in different parts of the world. By expanding beyond the perspective of North-South transfers, this book seeks to better understand the dynamics and diversity of interregional interactions. The first section looks at the purposes and logics behind regionalisms beyond their declared objectives, followed by a section on the dynamic relations between regionalisms, going beyond a European Union perspective. The final part looks at the place actors have other than states in the making of regionalisms. Throughout the volume, cases and empirical studies from Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa as well as Southeast Asia and the Southwest Pacific support these sections and challenge established notions of regionalism by going beyond a Eurocentric approach.

ankuendigung-druckfrisch_161122

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