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‘A comparison of the reconciliation barometers in South Africa and Rwanda’, New book chapter by Cori Wielenga

GovInn’s Senior Researcher Cori Wielenga published the book chapter ‘A comparison of the reconciliation barometers in South Africa and Rwanda’ in the book ‘Rethinking reconciliation: Evidence from South Africa‘ by HSRC Press.

Processes of reconciliation, transitional justice and healing are high on the global agenda, yet questions of how to measure their effectiveness remain a challenge. The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation (IJR), based in Cape Town, South Africa, has developed a survey that measures public opinion on reconciliation in that country. The South African Reconciliation Barometer (SARB) has been implemented annually between 2003 and 2014, and measures perceptions about progress in reconciliation in South Africa over time. In 2010, a reconciliation barometer was developed and implemented in Rwanda as well.
The indicators used between the two barometers differ for each context, and therefore their findings cannot be directly compared. Instead, this chapter explores the different contexts to better understand how and why the RRB was adapted for the Rwandan context, and what the surveys say about reconciliation in each case. This exploration contributes to the debate on whether or not reconciliation can be measured and how reconciliation barometers can enhance our understanding of national reconciliation processes.

Have a look at the book here: http://www.hsrcpress.ac.za/product.php?productid=2349&js=n

‘Rwanda & South Africa: a long road from truth to reconciliation’ by Cori Wielenga, The Conversation, 06.04.2017

GovInn’s Senior Researcher Cori Wielenga published the article ‘Rwanda & South Africa: a long road from truth to reconciliation‘ in The Conversation.

Rwanda took a different path. It focused on establishing individual perpetrators’ accountability for genocide crimes. Many were unsettled by this rigorous quest. There were calls for Rwanda to mimic South Africa and take the route of amnesty in exchange for truth. That would have assumed the wounds of the violent massacre of possibly a million people in three months were identical to the wounds of apartheid. I don’t want to suggest for a moment that wounds left by Rwanda’s genocide were harder to heal than those left by apartheid. But it’s critical to understand that they left behind different kinds of devastations.

Read the full article here: https://theconversation.com/rwanda-and-south-africa-a-long-road-from-truth-to-reconciliation-75628