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#FoodTalks SEMINAR: Student hunger and achieving the right to food for all, what role for universities?, 5 November 2019

The Centre for the Advancement of Scholarship (CAS) invites you to a #FoodTalks seminar on student hunger and achieving the right to food for all. The question being what role for universities? There will be academic, activist, and student perspectives brought by inputs from Professor Vishwas Satgar, Oluwafunmilola Adeniyi, and Elgin Hlaka. This event is organised in collaboration with the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Food Security, the Centre for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn), and the Human Economy Programme within CAS.

DATE Tuesday 5 November 2019
TIME 13:30 – 15:30
VENUE Old College House Seminar Lounge, 1-09, University of Pretoria
RSVP Cecelia Samson, 012 420 2653, cecelia.samson@up.ac.za

Too many students at our universities go hungry, negatively affecting their studies and their lives. At the same time, universities are sights of food selling and eating and are large buyers of food. There are great opportunities for universities to play a role in creating more sustainable and healthy food environments, for them to use their buying power to influence wider food systems,
and to inculcate healthy food production, processing and eating habits, not only in what they teach, but also in how they operate.

This #FoodTalks seminar will help us understand the food challenges and opportunities at universities, and to share from existing initiatives that are responding to these challenges.

Food talks to us at many levels, touching on important aspects of our lives and society. This is a continuation of a series of seminars that is bringing together leading thinkers and practitioners in the sector to share knowledge, and create a space to talk about the current food system and how we can move to a socially and ecologically regenerative, just and nourishing food system in South Africa and the region.

 

More details on this event can be found here.

Thank you very much for being with us today!

Mandela Day at GovInn: re-discovering the University with the children’s eyes

At GovInn we believe that the university must be an open and welcoming place. That is why, to celebrate Mandela Day, we decided to invite local children and teenagers to visit the University with us. We, as well as our visitors, discovered a few gems of the campus, such as the Sci-ENZA lab, the library and its Makers laboratory, and the Camera Obscura. We ended our day with a funny -and fiercely competitive- football tournament at the Campus Sport fields.
We are looking forward to welcoming our new friends as students when they grow up!

Drop classification of pupils to treat ‘academic autism’ Business Day 23.06.2015

“In June 1976, SA’s youth led one of the most extraordinary protests against a discriminatory approach to education. Their rebellion reverberated across the world to become the symbol of the struggle for freedom in our country. Yet, almost 40 years later, our education system remains exclusionary and fragmented,” writes Lorenzo Fioramonti in his latest column for Business Day.

Drop classification of pupils to treat ‘academic autism’

“Our national debate on education tacitly assumes that SA is divided into a majority of poorly resourced (public) schools and a few, mostly urban, very well-developed (private) schools. This may be true if we limit our observation to the physical infrastructure of the “good” schools. I have indeed never seen as many rugby fields, Olympic pools, beautiful halls and playgrounds as I have in private schools and some of the best-resourced public schools (most of which are public-private hybrids previously known as Model C).

But if we scratch beneath this flashy surface, we find serious problems with the education model there. First, many of them reinforce pre-existing racial and class patterns. This is not only because of high tuition fees but also because of the values they project. It is common for these schools to expect students to wear expensive uniforms, glorify conspicuous consumption (for instance, by allowing companies to advertise to pupils) and teach children that excellence is the result of competition.”

Read the full article “Drop classification of pupils to treat ‘academic autism’” on Business Day